Online Talk: From Brides to The Bridewell: Women’s Lives in a Glasgow City Block

Sepia image of Victorian Glasgow
Image © of Mitchell Library, Glasgow City Council

From Brides to The Bridewell: Women’s Lives in a Glasgow City Block

Thursday 12th May 2022 | 7.30pm | via Zoom

Join GCHT and Dr Nina Baker to look at what a particular street corner in the original heart of Glasgow tells us about the lives of the women who lived, worked and walked around it. 

Inspired by the redevelopment of a site near the corner of the High Street and Duke Street some years ago, Dr Baker has been investigating the history of this block and the range of buildings and uses it has had over the years, from manufacturing, housing, to commerce and social gatherings. She will discuss how she has used modern recorded data to draw out hints of how life was for ordinary women from the early 19th century onwards, and what two of the site’s most significant buildings – the marriage registry office and Bridewell Women’s Prison – represented to these women and the society in which they lived. 

Dr Nina Baker is an independent historian researching the history of women in engineering. She has had a varied career, starting with being a Merchant Navy Deck Officer before gaining an engineering design degree in her 30s, followed by a PhD in concrete durability from the University of Liverpool. She has lived with her family in Glasgow since 1989, and was a Glasgow City Councillor from 2007-17. She has recently published a biography of the aeronautical engineer, Hilda Lyon: Adventures in Aeronautical design. The life of Hilda M. Lyon.

Free, booking required, donations welcome. 

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Please note: Payment is taken via PayPal but you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay online. 

We are using Zoom to broadcast our live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

All events are subtitled. We aim to make our events as accessible as possible but if you feel that you might need some additional help, please let us know when you book your ticket or get in touch in advance. We’re open to feedback and would welcome your ideas on how we can improve in this area.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

All events are recorded and everyone who has booked will be sent a link to the recording to watch again after the event. We are a small team and this can take a couple of weeks so please bear with us!

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Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

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Online Talk: 19th Century Retail and the Rise of the Department Store

Wednesday 8th December 2021 | 7.30pm GMT | via Zoom

Focusing on architecture, window displays, and internal design, this talk will examine how Glasgow department stores, like their Parisian counterparts, became spaces not just of spectacle, but also of manipulation and disorientation.

The Map

“I feel like a bird soaring over the city when I gaze upon Sulman’s map, every nook and cranny with every detail so exact.

I can see where I came from and where I’m at.”

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Vacancy: Heritage Manager (Maternity Cover)

Three people wearing high viz jackets stand in front of a building covered in scaffolding

Heritage Manager (part-time / maternity cover)

3 days/week starting June 2022

£30,000 pro rata (£18,000) including Local Government Pension Scheme

Glasgow City Heritage Trust gives out almost £1 million in funding each year to help people in Glasgow protect, repair and promote the city’s historic buildings and places.

Through our conservation grants people enjoy, understand and care for Glasgow’s historic built environment and are able to access funding and expertise which ensures the sustainability of the city’s heritage for current and future generations. 

Our historic environment plays an important role in successful neighbourhoods and high streets which are vital as a local point for social and economic interactions and sustainable communities.

We have an exciting opportunity for a Heritage Manager (Maternity Cover) to join our team in the administration, and management of our Grants Programme in Glasgow aimed at historic building repairs, project development and heritage outreach and education work.

The 2022/23 Historic Environment Grants budget is just under £620,000. As the Heritage Manager you will take overall responsibility for the delivery of the new grants process, and management of a small team of Heritage Officers. You will work alongside the Heritage Manager responsible for the Trust’s Heritage Activities and will report to the Deputy Director and Grants Committee. 

You will have an informed interest in Glasgow’s heritage and will have relevant experience in a heritage, arts or culture organisation. 

The successful candidate will manifest our core values: passionate, collaborative, innovative and forward-looking.

The Trust offers a variety of benefits to employees, including generous employer pension contributions, flexible working, 25 days paid annual leave (pro rata) and excellent opportunities for training and development. 

GCHT welcomes applications from all sections of the community and is an equal opportunities employer.

For further details or to apply, please go to www.glasgowheritage.org.uk. Please don’t hesitate to contact the Director Torsten Haak via torsten@glasgowheritage.org.uk to arrange an informal discussion. 

The deadline for application submission is 25th April 2022 at 12:00 noon. Shortlisted candidates will be informed by 29th April 2022. Interviews will be held on 5th May 2022 via Zoom.

Heritage Manager (Maternity Cover) Job Description

Heritage Manager (Maternity Cover) Application for Employment

Commission: Gallus Glasgow Contemporary Bird’s Eye View

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is inviting expressions of interest to create a contemporary illustration interpreting and bringing to the present day Thomas Sulman’s Bird’s Eye View of Glasgow, 1864. 

The artwork will be used by Glasgow City Heritage Trust for interpretation and exploration of changes to Glasgow’s historic built environment as well as promotion, outreach activities and marketing, as part of its successful Gallus Glasgow project.

The successful artist/designer/illustrator will: 

  • Create a new, detailed, illustrated ‘bird’s eye view of Glasgow’ looking north from the southside of the Clyde, reflecting the original artwork and showing how Glasgow has developed and changed since 1864, highlighting key historic buildings, using drone footage as its inspiration.

The commissioning panel is interested in design ideas that: 

  • Reflect on the architectural draughtsman style of the original artwork.
  • Create an engaging artwork that considers how Glasgow’s built environment has changed between the original artwork in 1864 and the present day, highlighting key buildings. 
  • Use attention to detail and have exceptional production values.
  • Are suitable for a wide range of audiences.
  • Have the potential to be used both as a digital artwork and print, as required. 

Total commission value including all fees and materials as required: £1,770.00 (Drone imagery will be contracted and funded separately).

The deadline for the completed commission is 30th April 2022. 

To apply click here to download the Artist’s Brief. 

Deadline: Wednesday 9th February 2022, 10am

Interviews: Wednesday 16th February 2022, via Zoom

Could you be our new Heritage Officer? We’re hiring!

Three people wearing high viz jackets stand in front of a building covered in scaffolding

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is currently recruiting for a Heritage Officer (Grants).

Glasgow City Heritage Trust gives out almost £1 million in funding each year to help people in Glasgow protect, repair and promote the city’s historic buildings and places.

Through our conservation grants people enjoy, understand and care for Glasgow’s historic built environment and are able to access funding and expertise which ensures the sustainability of the city’s heritage for current and future generations. 

Our historic environment plays an important role in successful neighbourhoods and high streets which are vital as a local point for social and economic interactions and sustainable communities.

Heritage Officer (Grants)
Salary: £21,000 pa

Deadline for applications: Monday, 17 January 2022 at 12 noon. Shortlisted candidates will be informed by 24th January 2022.
Interviews: Thursday, 3 February 2022 via Zoom.

An exciting opportunity has become available for a Grants Officer to support the implementation of the Trust’s new Historic Built Environment Grants programme for the benefit of all people living and working in and visiting Glasgow.

You will be knowledgable about current building conservation practices and traditional building materials and techniques, and will have an informed interest in Glasgow’s heritage. You will have relevant heritage management, built heritage or conservation construction experience, which may include a formal qualification and/or membership of an appropriate professional body.

The successful candidate will manifest our core values: passionate, collaborative, innovative and forward-looking.

The Trust offers a variety of benefits to employees, including generous employer pension contributions, flexible working, 25 days paid annual leave, rising to 28 days after 3 years service and excellent opportunities for training and development. 

GCHT welcomes applications from all sections of the community and is an equal opportunities employer.

Job Description (.pdf)
Application Form (.doc)

To apply please use the links above to download the Job Description, and Application Form.

Application forms should be returned by email to info@glasgowheritage.org.uk.

Please don’t hesitate to contact the Director Torsten Haak via torsten@glasgowheritage.org.uk to arrange an informal discussion. 

Film: Foundations of our Future

Glasgow, like cities all around the world, is today at a very real risk from climate change. The city’s heritage is no stranger to these concerns, but our historic buildings are also part of the solution to the climate crisis.

In this video Taylor Cross-Whiter from Glasgow City Heritage Trust and David Harkin from Historic Environment Scotland travel around the city to visit the Briggait, Glasgow Central Station, Bell Street Stables and Govanhill Baths to speak to people on the ground about how historic buildings can provide sustainable solutions that help Glasgow mitigate climate change.

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Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

An open call for blog contributions

Interested in writing for GCHT? We’re opening up a call for blog articles for our Gallus Glasgow project. 

WHAT THIS IS ABOUT:

The Gallus Glasgow project uses Thomas Sulman’s intricate ‘Bird’s Eye View’ 1864 map of Glasgow as a catalyst for exploring the next 50 years of Glasgow’s development in the Victorian period, as it became ‘the Second City of the Empire’. A bespoke animation has been created by SUUM design studio that tells the story of the city of that time, whilst an interactive microsite featuring a zoomable version of the map will enable viewers to explore it in great detail. The project will also feature a series of events including online evening talks and short lunchtime seminars.

Throughout the project we hope to celebrate the achievements of the Victorian period in terms of Glasgow’s built heritage, but not shy away from the more difficult aspects and perhaps even turn a few established narratives on their head. From that point of view anything that might challenge the accepted view and surprise people would be of particular interest.

WHY WRITE FOR US? 

These are paid submissions! We can offer a fee of £100 per blog post.  Plus, you’ll be writing to help support the Glasgow City Heritage Trust and the Gallus Glasgow project. 

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity, and helping us expand and improve our educational resources is a great way to support us. Use the blog as a chance to share your knowledge with the community, or as an excuse to learn something new. You’ll get feedback from us, and end up with published writing to put on your CV.

Close, No. 118 High Street. Image: Annan Photographs Glasgow.

WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR:

We’re seeking articles that people will enjoy reading and that help them learn more about Glasgow’s Victorian built heritage and related topics. Here’s some of the kinds of things you could write about:

  • Stories about ordinary people’s lives – we are particularly interested in stories about women, children and the working classes. 
  • The legacy of slavery and Empire in the Victorian period. 
  • Immigration in the 19th century and its impact on the city and its communities. 
  • The impact of the industrial revolution on buildings, places and people’s lives.
  • Glasgow’s urban development in the period 1800-1900.
  • Maps and mapping.
  • Sport and leisure in Victorian Glasgow.
  • A particular building featured on Sulman’s map or built 1864-1914.
  • An architect, working in Glasgow during the period.
  • Or whatever else you’d like to write about related to Victorian Glasgow or Sulman’s Bird’s Eye View that you think our community would be interested in.

HOW THE SUBMISSION PROCESS WORKS:

  1. Write a draft of an article. Have fun with it.
  2. Submit your draft to us by email. See below! The draft should be a Word, Pages or Google Docs document (no PDFs).
  3. If we think it’s a good fit, our team will review it and suggest changes if necessary. 
  4. Approval, proofing, and publication.

We’ll try to respond to every submission, but we’re a small team, so please be patient with response times. We have a limited budget, so we might not be able to accept every submission. You will be paid only if your contribution is published.

ARTICLE GUIDELINES

  • Blogs should be 400 – 1,000 words max and in Word, Pages or Google Docs format.
  • Write in an informal tone, we find that delivers better results than an academic style
  • Content should be tailored to our target audience of women aged 25-45 years old. For us this means it might: 
    • Be thought provoking & eye-opening
    • Be well-informed but not patronising
    • Tell diverse stories
    • Be relatable to ordinary Glaswegians
    • Be uplifting & celebratory but doesn’t gloss over tough subjects – challenging at times.

Information to be submitted with your blog:

  • Title of the article, set in bold.
  • Your name directly below the title.
  • A brief writer’s profile of no more than three sentences
  • A link to your social media profile(s) (optional)
  • A high-res photograph of yourself (optional). Photos can be professional or more relaxed.
  • At least one illustrative image to accompany the blog
    • A caption for your image.
    • You’ll need to report the source (the images shouldn’t be protected by copyright). If the image is from the internet then please send a link as well.
    • Images should be at least 800px wide.
    • Images are not to be inserted into the text, but are to be sent as a separate attachment.

HOW WE’LL CREDIT YOU:

  • All authors of blog posts will be cited in the published item and a short profile can be included at the end of your piece, with links to your social media profiles, if provided.
  • All text published on GCHT’s website will be under a Creative Commons license, whereby work can be quoted or reproduced elsewhere as long as it is properly attributed and linked back to GCHT, and as long as it is not reproduced for commercial use.
  • The guest blog will be added to our website, and shared across our, and potentially our partners, social networks. We will tag you in any social posts, where possible. 

SOUND GOOD? 

If you would like to chat to us about your chosen topic, you can forward your questions or suggestions to the Outreach team by email,  outreach@glasgowheritage.org.uk. Your email should be clearly marked with the words ‘Blog entry’ in the title. Though, please note, we do not require a topic to be pre-approved and we accept submissions on a rolling basis.

Have fun, and good luck!

GCHT is launching a podcast!

A great host, interesting guests and intriguing topics are all essential ingredients to make a great podcast… but do you know what else could make our new podcast truly amazing?…

You!

A black and white photo of the Glasgow skyline, with speech bubbles coming up out of the buildings. There is red text that says "If Glasgow's Walls Could Talk by Glasgow City Heritage Trust".

PLACES AND PEOPLE

“If Glasgow’s Walls Could Talk” – a new podcast series produced by Glasgow City Heritage Trust – explores the relationships, stories and shared memories that exist between Glasgow’s historic buildings and places and the city’s communities. We have ten episodes in the bag, but now we need your help to develop phase two of this great project!

From August to October 2021 we will ask you to share your memories and thoughts about a specific topic, we will be selecting the best messages to be included in the podcast!

EXPERIENCES, THOUGHTS, KNOWLEDGE AND MEMORIES

Each episode focuses on a specific area, type of building or aspect of Glasgow’s heritage, not only from a historical and architectural point of view, but also from the perspective of the community; drawing on the guests’ personal experiences, thoughts, knowledge and memories.

The podcast, launching in late October, has an informative yet informal style. The topics covered, are varied and appealing to a wide audience, such as murals, the mapping of queer heritage, tenement living, heritage and disabilities and many many others.

CURIOUS?

You can now listen Episode Zero of “If Glasgow’s Walls Could Talk” on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google, Amazon, Podcast Addict, PlayerFM and wherever you get your podcasts. Don’t forget to subscribe!

 

CONTRIBUTE TO THE PODCAST

You will be able to find all the different topics and the instructions of how to leave a message on this page, we will be changing the topics on a regular basis, so keep an eye out and be sure to follow us on social media @GlasgowHeritage #IfGlasgowsWallsCouldTalk

The easiest way to contribute to our podcast is via our online survey

But there are also other ways to leave a message:

  1. On our dedicated phone line at 07902976218 – Call the number above and leave us a voicemail on our answering machine. Your call will be automatically redirected to voicemail. (Please be aware that you need to make a mobile phone call not a WhatsApp or other wifi Voice Call)

You can leave us a voice message on WhatsApp at the same number. To do this:

  • Open a new chat, and select or add our podcasts phone number.
  • Make sure you have the Message box selected.
  • Tap and hold the microphone and start speaking.
  • Once finished, remove your finger from the microphone. The voice message will automatically send.

2) You can drop us an email at podcast@glasgowheritage.org.uk and we will have someone else read it out for you on the podcast. Please be mindful of the length of your message – not more than 300 words.

Remember to share some information about yourself in your message, such as your name, age and where you come from.

IMPORTANT:

Please be aware that by sharing a memory with us you are agreeing to have your memory (and your voice where relevant) shared publicly on the podcast, read the terms and conditions.

TOPICS

We are asking you to share your memories and thoughts about the following topics, we added some questions to inspire you but please feel free to share whatever memory, thought, opinion you have on the topic!

TENEMENTS AND TENEMENT LIVING:

This episode focuses on the experience of living in a tenement, in the past and in the present. We will be exploring the story of tenements in Glasgow, and tenements as communities.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

  • Do you live in a tenement?
  • What was your favourite aspect of living in a tenement?
  • What memories do you have of living in a tenement?
  • Why do you think living in a tenement is so special?
  • Do you have any special memory linked to tenement living? 

LEGACY OF SLAVERY:

In this episode we will explore the legacy of slavery in Glasgow and on the buildings and streets that were built on the back of the slavery trade. We will be exploring how Scotland dealt with its past and how we can interpret it correctly for future generations.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

  • How much do you know of Glasgow’s past?
  • Do you know how many buildings and streets are named after the Tobacco Lords?
  • What do you think is the best way to interpret this aspect of Glasgow’s past?
  • How can we review and reinterpret this history, taking into consideration all the stories that were left behind?

MAPPING QUEER GLASGOW:

In this episode we will talk about Scottish LGBTQ+ history and places and how Queer stories are researched and interpreted. Queer spaces, bars, pubs, book shops have such an important role in queer history how can we make these spaces relevant?

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

  • How can we research and collect Queer stories and make them relevant again? What sort of traces have past LGBTQ+ people left behind?
  • Is there a building you think is representative of Queer history in Glasgow? What is your experience? 

COMMUNITY OWNERSHIP AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS:

This episode focuses on community ownership and historic buildings and on historic school buildings in particular, why there are so many and how the community can get involved in their preservation?

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

  • Do you live next to a derelict building?
  • Why are public buildings important for communities?
  • Do you used to go to a school that is now demolished or derelict? What are your memories of it?

ACCESSIBILITY AND INCLUSIVITY:

This episode investigates accessibility and inclusivity in relationship to Glasgow’s historic built environment and heritage sector. 

Architectural, structural and social barriers of all kinds are at the root of disabled people’s exclusion and inequality, and are an obstacle to their enjoyment and appreciation of heritage, culture and art.

Looking at the most recent datas from Visit Scotland (2021), in Scotland, one in five people is disabled, only 8% of Scottish people with disabilities are wheelchair users and 70% have disabilities that are invisible.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

  • What do you think needs to be done in order to create spaces that are truly accessible and inclusive of people with disabilities? 
  • What makes a space truly fully accessible and what are the steps to achieve this status? Do you think that  Glasgow is an accessible city? 
  • What is your experience of accessibility in heritage spaces?

HISTORIC MUSIC VENUES AND BALLROOMS:

In this episode we will be exploring historic music venues and ballrooms as spaces of interactions and connection.

The period between the start of the First World War and the mid-1950s is known as the golden age of social dancing in Glasgow, when the city had at least eighty dance halls! By the mid-1950s onwards, ballroom dancing declined in popularity and a lot of the most popular ball rooms had to  turn  into music venues to survive  in an attempt to adapt to the ever changing times, but successfully continuing to be spaces of social gathering and fun.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! 

  • How many of your favourite memories are linked to a ball room or a music venue, such as the Locarno, Barrowland Ballroom, Dennistoun Palais? Can you share them with us?
  • How important do you think these spaces are for our collective memory? 
  • Is your favourite venue still in business? If not, how did you feel when it closed?
  • How much have these buildings have shaped your life, memories and relationships? 

GLASGOW’S MURALS:

This episode focuses on Glasgow’s amazing murals and who are the people and the organisations behind them. The word mural originates from the Latin word “murus”, meaning wall, any artwork painted or applied onto a wall can de defined as mural art.

As powerful representations of society, these amazing works of art around our city can be often political and sometimes controversial. In the last decade Glasgow flourished with murals that can be found almost everywhere in the city, covering a huge variety of topics, from Saints’s lives to flying taxis, pelicans and poems. 

Each mural tells a unique story and enriches the urban landscape.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! 

  • Do you have a favourite mural in Glasgow? Which one and why?
  • Do you think murals enrich Glasgow’s urban landscape? If yes, why?
  • What would you like to see depicted on a mural? Dream big!

STADIUMS AND FOOTBALL:

In this episode we will be talking about football and its social importance, and also about how much  stadiums shaped and influenced Glaswegians’ lives during the centuries.

Football in Scotland goes back to almost 600 years ago and, just like nowadays, was enjoyed by monarchs such as James IV and Mary Queen of Scots, and commoners alike. Glasgow is home to a few iconic stadiums whose history is deeply intertwined with the history of the city and its people, like Ibrox Stadium (Category A listed) and Hampden Park, both designed by  the same Glasgow born architect, Archibald Leitch, (27 April 1865 – 25 April 1939).

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! 

  • Do you have a favourite stadium? 
  • What is your favourite memory of going to a match in Glasgow? Can you share it with us?
  • How much do you think football as a collective experience shape people’s lives and relationships in Glasgow?

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY (MUSIC HALLS, THEATRES AND CINEMAS):

In this episode we will exploring Glasgow’s entertainment industry in the last  two centuries or so, our city has been home to a huge number of theatres, cinemas  and music halls. During the years these spaces occupied (and still do!) a significant role in the social and architectural life of the city and in people’s memories. 

If we look at the number and variety of historic cinemas, music halls and theatres…Glaswegians are definitely spoiled for choice! 

Think about  the Theatre Royal (A listed), the Citizens Theatre (B listed), the Britannia Panopticon Music Hall (A listed) Glasgow Film Theatre (B listed), or Govanhill Picture House (B listed), just to name a few!

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! 

  • What is your favourite historic theatre/cinema in Glasgow? Why?
  • Do you have a special memory linked to going to the theatre/cinema?Can you share them with us
  • If you could travel back in time, which movie/show would you like to watch? Where? With whom?

ARCHITECTURAL, STRUCTURAL AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS IN GLASGOW:

In this episode we will be talking about Glasgow’s convoluted history of demolition and redevelopment in the second half of 20th century and how it affected people’s lives.

After the Second World War, the majority of the houses built during the Victorian period were considered a “housing problem”, for the high density, poor sanitation and  structural deficiencies that characterised them.

The most common solution adopted to solve Glasgow’s “housing crisis” in the second half of the 20th century was to demolish the old tenements and re-house some of the population.  In later years due to a change of the political, social and economic climate the effect of the demolition of entire areas became clear and there was a new awareness of the loss “of the community spirit” that was left in the old, now gone, tenements flats.  (Picture courtesy of the Scottish Jewish Archives Centre- Staff at Fogell’s bakery and grocery shop in Hospital Street, Gorbals, 1962)

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

  • Were you, or your family affected by re-housing and/or demolition of certain areas?
  • Do you have a special memory linked to an area/building that has now been demolished?
  • Can you share it with us?
  • Is there anything of past Glasgow that you miss? Is there any way we can bring it back?
  • How do you think these architectural, structural and social transformations affected the spirit of the communities?

Spread the word and stay tuned by searching for #IfGlasgowsWallsCouldTalk on social media and following us @GlasgowHeritage on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. 

 

You will be able to listen to “If Glasgow Wall’s Could Talk” by late October, after our official launch.

“If Glasgow’s Walls Could Talk” is produced by Inner Ear, sponsored by National Trust for Scotland and kindly supported by Tunnock’s.

You might also be interested in...

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Online Talk: Community Ownership of Historic Buildings

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

An old dilapidated school in the background, a railing with colourful knitting on it in the foreground

Thursday 22nd July 2020 | 7:30 pm | via Zoom 

Community ownership can have direct benefits for neighbourhoods and people by enabling local control of assets and the ability to respond first-hand to community needs.

Join Glasgow City Heritage Trust, the Community Ownership Support Service, and Community Land Scotland’s Community Ownership Hub to hear about the routes to ownership available to communities concerned about vacant and at-risk historic buildings. Learn about the ownership options, the difference between terms like Community Asset Transfer and Community Right to Buy, what factors to consider when thinking about community ownership, and how to work with the stakeholders involved.

Open to anyone interested in learning more about community activism and saving vacant, at-risk historic buildings.

The Community Ownership Support Service is a Scottish Government funded programme, set up to help community groups in Scotland take on assets for their community.

Community Land Scotland is the voice of Scotland’s community landowners. The new Community Ownership Hub: Glasgow and Clyde Valley is encouraging and enabling more community ownership in the region through increased support, action research, and promotion of land reform.

This event is part of GCHT’s Historic Built Investment Forum, a series of events focused on issues currently facing Glasgow’s built heritage and how the historic environment can act as a driver for sustainable development.

Event Recording: 

We are using Zoom to broadcast our live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Feature: An Introduction to Traditional Sign Writing

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

GCHT grantees Lindsay and Simone opened their store “The Bridal Courtyard” in 2021. With the help of GCHT Traditional Skills funding, they employed traditional sign writers Scott and Ross Hastie to create beautiful, hand painted signage on their shop window. Lindsay and Simone interviewed Scott and Ross to find out more about their craft! Check out the video below to see Ross in action and learn more about his craft and how his journey into his fascinating career.

Lindsay and Simone’s vision: “Our aim at the Bridal Courtyard was to remove the purple vinyl machine made logo on our main window and bring our signage back to a formal Victorian glory, in keeping with the Italiante style Tannery Building in which we are housed. Therefore, we employed Ross to create Traditional gold leaf signage.”

Window Signage Before:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Window Signage After:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The artist, Ross Hastie: Ross takes inspiration from the spectrum of traditional and contemporary design. His colour choices, lettering styles and effects are carefully chosen for each individual project. He considers styles and trends correct to the intended era, and aims to be in keeping with established themes in each individual project.

The Project Team:

To find out more about Traditional Skills grants, check out our Guidance Notes.

 

An Interview with Traditional Sign Writers Scott & Ross Hastie Recorded at “The Bridal Courtyard” in April 2021.

Visit the Bridal Courtyard: www.bridalcourtyard.com

Follow The Bridal Courtyard on Instagram: @thebridalcourtyard

Visit Ross Hastie Signs: www.rosshastiesigns.com

Follow Ross Hastie Signs on Instagram: @rosshastiesigns

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Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

From ceramic graffiti to guerrilla knitting: public art in lockdown Glasgow

By Rachel Kacir, Heritage Outreach Manager

The long months of lockdown have been hard for most of us. Getting out for a walk and some fresh air each day has been one way of relieving the boredom and taking care of our mental health too. However, even the most beautiful and interesting of routes becomes a bit tedious if you’re treading it every day…

MYSTERY SCULPTURES

Whilst out on my wanders in Dennistoun a few weeks ago though I came across something that brightened up my day. It was a little pink and gold ceramic sculpture with flowers on it that had been stuck to a brick wall. I found it quite intriguing, who had put it there? And why? A bit of digging on social media led me to the work of Louise McVey, a ceramic artist and musician. Louise’s work will probably be familiar to many, as it’s been popping up across Glasgow for a while now. I met up with Louise for a socially distanced chat outside Wasps artist studios on Hanson Street, where she is based and coincidentally just across the road from the sculpture I spotted. 

Exterior of City Park building, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow

WILLS CIGARETTE FACTORY

The studios are housed in what was a tobacco factory, just along the road from the old Wills Cigarette factory building on Alexandra Parade. Constructed in the mid 1940s, at its peak Wills factory employed 3,500 people and produced 260 million cigarettes a week. It closed in 1990 and was later used as the production office for the film Trainspotting. Although set in Edinburgh, many interior scenes were shot there too. The building is now known as City Park and houses offices, call centres, a gym and a nursery.

Bright ceramic sculptures stuck to a rock
A small ceramic sculpture of a teapot, a couple of drops of tea and a disc saying 'Window'

CERAMIC GRAFFITI

Louise began producing outdoor pieces in 2015 after a stay at the Princess Royal Maternity Hospital, also nearby. During her time in the hospital she was drawn to the atrium, an empty and inaccessible space. She felt a sculpture would sit well there and would give staff and patients something to look at. So she created a piece as a thank you for the care she had received. 

Just before lockdown Louise took home some finished pieces from her studio, sensing that she might need them. In the year since, she has anonymously placed many of them in public places, a practice she refers to as ‘ceramic graffiti’. Louise felt she wanted to connect with people and do something constructive at a time of such uncertainty. She explains “With a high level of social anxiety in the air, and with walking being one of the few outlets for most people, what started off as an intuitive action developed into one of my perceived social responsibilities and pleasures”. 

The reaction has been overwhelmingly positive (aside from one lady in the West End who wasn’t too keen on the work Louise was placing near her home). Louise says “the response was very unexpected, and really encouraged me to continue. I feel like the work belongs to the communities. I have received the most heartwarming messages, and feel more connected through the process” 

An old dilapidated school in the background, a railing with colourful knitting on it in the foreground
An abandoned bike that has been covered in colourful thread

GUERILLA KNITTING

Whilst Dennistoun has been getting its fair share of ceramic graffiti, nearby Haghill has been the target of some guerrilla knitting! Also known as ‘yarn bombing’, this is a type of street art that uses yarn or fibre rather than paint to create colourful knitted or crocheted displays. In this case, it has been used by a group of locals to brighten up the railings of the old Haghill Primary School. A bike left inside the railing has also been covered. Those involved hope it will encourage people to take pride in their area and provide a catalyst to reducing problems such as dog fouling and littering. 

HAGHILL PUBLIC SCHOOL

The building was originally Haghill Public School and was constructed by the School Board of Glasgow in 1904. Unlike other school boards, Glasgow brought in a range of architects to design its buildings, giving them a distinctive character. This one was designed by Andrew Lindsay Miller and is noteworthy for being set within a square of traditional tenements. The school building was closed in 1994 and despite being Category B listed its condition has badly deteriorated since. Despite some interest from commercial developers, it remains derelict and on the Buildings at Risk Register

TRANSFORMING GLASGOW

As lockdown restrictions in Glasgow start to ease, our new evening lecture series will be looking to the past for inspiration and possible solutions as the city finds its way out of the pandemic and the challenges that lie ahead. The ‘Transforming Glasgow’ series will focus on how Glasgow has changed and reinvented itself in a variety of ways from the latter half of the 20th century onwards to today. How have these changes come about and what has the impact been? What lessons can be learned? Keep an eye on our website for details.

And if you are looking for outdoor activities to do with the children, download our series of Kids Heritage Trails for free here  

Check out Louise McVey’s work on her website, and on Instagram, @louisemcveyartist or why not get out exploring and see if you can find some yourself?

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Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

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Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.