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Online Talk: 19th Century Retail and the Rise of the Department Store

Wednesday 8th December 2021 | 7.30pm GMT | via Zoom

Focusing on architecture, window displays, and internal design, this talk will examine how Glasgow department stores, like their Parisian counterparts, became spaces not just of spectacle, but also of manipulation and disorientation.

The Map

“I feel like a bird soaring over the city when I gaze upon Sulman’s map, every nook and cranny with every detail so exact.

I can see where I came from and where I’m at.”

Edward’s story

A DIFFERENT DIRECTION Another day at the warehouse done. He’s a clerk, so there’s always lots of paperwork to get through and it requires great attention to detail. He’s a conscientious and well-organised individual though, so he enjoys it and the satisfaction he gets when a job is done well. 

Online Workshop: Basket Weaving with Max Johnson

Friday 12th November 2021 | 2.30pm GMT | via Zoom

It is thought that the advent of hot air ballooning in the 1820s played a major role in the popularisation of panoramas like Sulman’s. With hot air balloon baskets as our inspiration, join us for this workshop to see how Max Johnson creates his beautiful handwoven baskets, using locally foraged dogwood sticks.

Online Talk: Maps, Myths & Misrepresentations

Wednesday 12th January 2022 | 7.30pm BST | via Zoom

Not so long ago, the lofty peaks of the Benchichins Mountains could be seen between Angus and Deeside… or could they? Chris Fleet looks at various other things on maps that might never have been really out there, as well as how maps lie, distort the truth and miss things out. How far should we trust the map, and is this a good idea?

Online Talk: Where are the Women?

Wednesday 9th February 2022 | 7.30pm BST | via Zoom

Can you imagine a different Glasgow, a city where women are commemorated in statues and streets and buildings?

Join author Sara Sheridan as she talks about her guidebook to that alternative city. Where are the Women? remaps Scotland as if women’s achievements were memorialised in our built and rural landscape in the same way as men’s are.