Designer Brief: The Knight Map Exhibition

GCHT is inviting tenders for the design of our upcoming exhibition, which will showcase Glasgow’s historic built environment through the artist Will Knight’s recently completed map of the city.

Click here for the full design brief

Deadline: 10th March, 2023 at 9:00am

Enquiries and submissions should be made by email to: info@glasgowheritage.org.uk

Kids Trail Toolkit

Our Kids Heritage Trails have been so popular that we’ve decided to develop a toolkit to help you create your own! So if you fancy making a trail and learning a little bit about the heritage of your local area along the way, just click the image below!

The toolkit is full of advice, ideas and resources to help you.

Need a hand with the design? Access our kids trail template on Canva. Canva is a free-to-use online graphic design tool. Teachers can access additional resources such as lesson plans, infographics, posters, video, and more by signing up with your education email address or upload proof of your teaching certification.

We’d love to see pictures of you enjoying our trails or creating your own – you can show them to us on our Twitter, Instagram or Facebook pages – use the hashtag #glasgowkidstrails.

Blog Post: 5 Institutional Changes to Improve Social Media Accessibility

Photo of a keyboard key which says Access and a symbol of an unlocked padlock

The key improvements to the accessibility of cultural heritage social media content are the implementation of best practices, appropriate language, and a digital communication policy, as well as an honest and inclusive approach to content creation. The implementation of best practices must be made routine within the organisation, a task which can be aided by the creation of a guidance document. Recommendations include putting out a call for D/deaf and visually impaired people to test social media content, as well as gaining their insights on language, terminology and inclusion.

There are many institutional changes which can enable the improvement of your organisation’s social media accessibility. The following suggestions have the potential to make your organisation and its content more friendly for D/deaf and visually impaired people.   

Photo of scrunched up balls of brightly coloured paper and a stack of post-it notes, with the word training written on the top post-it.
Image of a group of people looking at a tablet.
Photo of colourful speech and thought bubbles against a light blue background.
An image of someones hands on a laptop keyboard. They are typing. Coming off the keyboard and up into the air are the images for a 'like' on Facebook (a white thumbs up on a blue circle) and also for a like on Twitter (a white heart on a red circle).

1. Undertake Training

Taking part in training on subjects such as disability awareness, social media best practices, and writing successful alt text, can ensure that staff become more aware of accessibility issues when it comes to social media. This, in turn, enables the development of knowledge on the steps needed to make content more accessible and inclusive.  This training may take the form of paid workshops with external organisations such as VocalEyes. However, there are also numerous free resources available online which would allow all organisations to better understand accessibility best practices. AccessibilityNet, for example, has produced a webinar entitled “How To Do Accessible Social Media” which outlines best practices for Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Youtube.

2. Improve Transparency

To make content more accessible, cultural heritage organisations need to take an honest and transparent approach, highlighting what is currently being done to improve accessibility, and what current barriers D/deaf and visually impaired people may face when trying to view the organisation’s social media content. It is likely that honesty like this could better encourage D/deaf and visually impaired audiences to view cultural heritage social media content, knowing what practices have been put into place to ensure equal access.

3. Ensure Appropriate Language and Terminology

Getting your language and terminology right is extremely important as it can have an enormous impact on the experience D/deaf and visually impaired people have with an organisation. Using appropriate terminology can enable people to feel more comfortable and included within the organisation. This can be done by actively involving D/deaf and visually impaired people in conversations about the terminology used. This will ensure that organisations do not marginalise communities, nor cause offence to any group.

4. Develop Better Inclusion and Representation

Long term, organisations must better include D/deaf and visually impaired people in their practices, gaining a better understanding of their perspective, and lived experiences. This could be done by getting advice on issues such as terminology and language and getting feedback on the accessibility of the content being produced.

5. Develop a Digital Communications Policy/Strategy

Digital policies/strategies can provide useful guidance on issues of accessibility and inclusivity, raise awareness of successful digital approaches, and may improve the consistency of social media content. Digital strategy guidance and resources include the Digital Culture Network’s “Introduction to Digital Strategy” and Cogapp’s “Digital Strategy for Museums” guide.

Headshot of a smiling young woman with blonde hair. She is wearing a green woolly hat and a green turtleneck jumper. She is outside and you can see the sea behind her with a green hill to her right.

This guide was written by Eve Alderson. Eve completed her MSc Museum Studies at the University of Glasgow in 2021, writing her dissertation in collaboration with Glasgow City Heritage Trust. She currently works as a Philanthropy Executive at the National Railway Museum

You might also be interested in...

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

I am text block. Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Blog Post: 5 Best Practices for Creating Accessible Social Media Content

Photo of a hand with a phone in front of a laptop; there are floating icons of different social media symbols coming out of the screen.
Photo of a woman in a yellow shirt smiling at her phone.
A birds eye look at a table with people sat around it. Two of them have on smart watches. On the table are some smart phones and tablets. Alongside there are logos from the major social media companies: LinkedIn, Facebook, WhatsApp, Snapchat, Instagram, and YouTube.
Pile of badges which feature various emoji faces on them.

Social media has the potential to enable a sense of connection for D/deaf and visually impaired people. For cultural heritage organisations, marketing and visibility are key advantages of social media. Social media platforms can therefore be leveraged in order to build connections with a more diverse audience, providing the space for conversation and dialogue with harder to reach audiences.

Accessibility should be a key consideration when creating social media content. There are many small changes that can be made to ensure that your posts are accessible to all that want to view them. The following best practices indicate some of the ways in which small actions can make a huge difference to the accessibility of your organisation’s content: 

1. Include Alternative Text

Alternative text, AKA alt-text, provides description of an image on posted on social media, allowing the image to be visualised by those who are not able to see it. A lack of alt-text is one of the biggest barriers to social media content for visually impaired users. Some platforms, such as Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, allow you to add alt-text to your posts within their post settings. Take a look at Tug Agency’s guidance for more information. 

2. Add Closed Captions and Transcripts

When posting video content, it is important to ensure that the audio is accessible to D/deaf people. Automated closed captions can be used, however, it’s also important to check that these are correct, as they may not always provide an accurate representation of what has been said. 

3. Consider Colour contrast 

If including images or infographics, you should make sure to consider colour contrast. The ideal colour contrast between text and background colour is 4:5:1, as is recommended by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG). You can check this using WebAIM’s Contrast Checker. 

4. Use Camel Case Hashtags

When adding hashtags to social media posts, make sure to use CamelCase by capitalising the first letter of every word, e.g., #GlasgowCityHeritageTrust rather than #glasgowcityheritagetrust. By doing this, hashtags can be read out correctly by screen readers, making content more accessible to visually impaired social media users. 

5. Limit Emoji Use 

While emojis can be a good way of making posts fun and engaging, it’s important to make sure they are not overused. Text-to-speech software, a type of assistive technology which reads text aloud, will read out a description of every emoji you include. So, if you include four smiley faces at the end of a post, this will be read out as “smiley face, smiley face, smiley face, smiley face”, which can become quite frustrating. 

Headshot of a smiling young woman with blonde hair. She is wearing a green woolly hat and a green turtleneck jumper. She is outside and you can see the sea behind her with a green hill to her right.

This guide was written by Eve Alderson. Eve completed her MSc Museum Studies at the University of Glasgow in 2021, writing her dissertation in collaboration with Glasgow City Heritage Trust. She currently works as a Philanthropy Executive at the National Railway Museum.

Gizza Hoose: Post-War Housing Struggles in Glasgow from 1948 to Today (Online Talk)

A black and white photo of a woman and child walking through a high rise estate.

Wednesday 25th January | 7pm | via Zoom

This talk will look at how housing movements and tenant struggles have shaped, and been shaped by, Glasgow’s ever changing housing stock. Tenements, high rises and new builds have all called forth different tactics, strategies and demands as the city transformed, and we will trace a tradition of rent strikes, occupations and protest that continues up to today.
Joey is a writer and artist from Glasgow. He is co-founder of the Glasgow Housing Struggle Archive, a member of the National Committe of Living Rent –  Scotland’s tenants’ union. He is currently working on a number of projects with the CCA, Platform, Glasgow Sculpture Studios, Edwin Morgan Trust and the Travelling Gallery.

Free, booking required, donations welcome. 

Please note: Payment is taken via PayPal but you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay online. 

We are using Zoom to broadcast our live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

All events are subtitled. We aim to make our events as accessible as possible but if you feel that you might need some additional help, please let us know when you book your ticket or get in touch in advance. We’re open to feedback and would welcome your ideas on how we can improve in this area.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

All events are recorded and everyone who has booked will be sent a link to the recording to watch again after the event. We are a small team and this can take a couple of weeks so please bear with us!

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

CPD: The Risks of Fire in Historic Buildings

Dark background with orange and yellow flames on the right hand side. It isn't clear what is on fire.

Monday 14th November 2022 | 12.30-1.30pm | In person & via Zoom

Every year, historic properties are lost to fire across the UK: in the last five years Belfast, Glasgow, and Liverpool have all suffered the loss of irreplaceable buildings.  Conservation Architect Peter Drummond will provide an overview of the special risks which are found on historic buildings, how designers can assess these risks, and the development of a holistic approach which protects buildings and their occupants.

Peter Drummond has worked on a wide range of conservation projects across the UK and Ireland, focussing on heritage-led regeneration. A trustee of the RIAS, he chaired the Scottish Government’s Fire Safety Review Panel 2020-22 and was recently Crown expert at the Fatal Accident Inquiry for the Cameron House Fire.

We will be running this session both online via Zoom and in person at the GCHT office (54 Bell Street, Glasgow). Lunch will be provided for the in-person attendees. A recording of the event will be available for everyone who signs up.

All GCHT CPD sessions are recognised by the IHBC, and attendees can obtain a CPD certificate upon completion.

£15 per person / £10 for students

 

All sessions are recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as being capable of contributing to the obligatory CPD requirements of Full Members (see www.ihbc.org.uk)

We are using Zoom to broadcast our live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

We aim to make our events as accessible as possible but if you feel that you might need some additional help, please let us know when you book your ticket or get in touch in advance. We’re open to feedback and would welcome your ideas on how we can improve in this area.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

*** SOLD OUT *** Workshop: Festive Wreath Making

A Christmas wreath lying on green grass. The wreath is made from a circle of willow with holly leaves, pine needles, red berries and green leaves coming off it.

Tuesday 6th December 2022 | 6:30-8:30pm | GCHT, 54 Bell Street, G1 1LQ

People have been making wreaths for thousands of years to attract good, repel evil, celebrate special events, symbolise spiritual concepts, and mark the seasons. Making them is incredibly relaxing and meditative, a chance to engage with nature and express yourself creatively.

In this workshop you’ll learn how to weave a wooden circle out of willow, and then how to decorate it using foraged materials. The end product will be a beautiful wreath that you can take home and re-decorate multiple times over its years-long lifespan.

Join us for weaving and mince pies for a cosy festive time!

This session is suitable for beginners, no weaving experience necessary. All equipment and materials provided.

£35 per person

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

****SOLD OUT**** In Person Talk: Legacies of Slavery and Empire in Glasgow’s Architectural Heritage

A photograph of Glasgow's Gallery of Modern Art at sunset. It's dark outside however the sky has a light purple hue. There are Christmas lights outside the building.

Wednesday 26th October | 6:30pm BST | Glasgow City Chambers 

Join Dr Anthony Lewis from Glasgow Life to hear how legacies of slavery and empire in Glasgow are manifested in its architecture from the 17th and 18th centuries. Dr Lewis will focus on the city’s architectural heritage in existing spaces, streets and buildings and review the past as discovered and displayed in Glasgow Life museum collections.

Dr Lewis is the curator for Scottish History for Glasgow Life Museums. He has researched Georgian Glasgow’s urban and architectural history and delivered exhibitions and publications.

Free, booking required, donations welcome. 

Please note: Payment is taken via PayPal but you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay online. 

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Online Talk: Taps Aff! The Mystery of the Missing Monuments: What Happened After the 1988 Glasgow Garden Festival?

Photograph of a large golden tap sculpture which appears to be floating in a flower bed. There is water coming from the tap down into the ground.

Thursday 6th October | 7pm BST | via Zoom

The 1988 Garden Festival changed how the world saw Glasgow, and how it saw itself. It lives on only in people’s memories as the buildings, objects and artworks from this temporary event are gone forever – or are they? 

Join Urban Prehistorian Kenny Brophy, Project Leader Lex Lamb, and Holder of the Official Garden Festival Umbrella Gordon Barr to learn how they have used crowdsourcing to build an ever growing digital record of the hundreds of pavilions, sculptures and attractions that made up the Festival.

Items and memories are scattered across the globe with stories to tell: from the large (the Coca-cola Roller Coaster, now in Suffolk), to the small (a Garden Festival tea-towel, now in Papua New Guinea); we’ve identified surviving artefacts that delighted visitors over that unforgettable summer, more than thirty years ago. 

This will outline what we’ve learned in the last 6 months about how the 1988 Festival was put together, taken apart and spread around the world, with the help of hundreds of individual submissions and leads, with plenty hidden in plain sight closer to home.

But we still haven’t found the giant tap, sorry.

To donate directly to the project please visit: https://www.glasgowgardenfestival.org

Free, booking required, donations welcome. 

Please note: Payment is taken via PayPal but you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay online. 

We are using Zoom to broadcast our live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

All events are subtitled. We aim to make our events as accessible as possible but if you feel that you might need some additional help, please let us know when you book your ticket or get in touch in advance. We’re open to feedback and would welcome your ideas on how we can improve in this area.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

All events are recorded and everyone who has booked will be sent a link to the recording to watch again after the event. We are a small team and this can take a couple of weeks so please bear with us!

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

What Next for Glasgow’s City Centre? In-Person Panel Discussion

Photograph of Glasgow skyline at sunset

Wednesday, 28th September  | 7:00pm | The Merchants House, 7 West George Street, G2 1BA

Join GCHT for an in-person panel discussion that asks the question, “What Next for Glasgow’s City Centre?” 

Our panelists will look at the challenges currently affecting the city centre such as the legacy of the Covid 19 pandemic, the high number of vacant buildings and the decline in shopfront retail, as well as how solutions to these challenges can help tackle the climate crisis. 

After hearing from our expert panelists, we’ll open it up to you for questions and discussion, so you can have your say about how we can shape a city centre that maintains its historic character and is accessible, safe and functional for Glasgow’s people and visitors. 

The event will be chaired by Bailie Christy Mearns, Depute Lord Provost 

The panellists will be: 

Paola Pasino, Glasgow City Council 

Tam Coyle, Chair of the Merchant City & Trongate Community Council 

Thierry Lye, Chair of the New Glasgow Society 

Euan Leitch, Chief Executive of SURF 

Booking Essential 

£7 per person, £5 concessions 

Please note: Payment is taken via PayPal but you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay online. 

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.