News

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Our Kids Heritage Trails are now available online. Click on any of the images below and then you’ll be able to download and print the trails in a new easy-to-print format.

We’d love to see some pictures of you enjoying the trails – you can show them to us on our Twitter, Instagram or Facebook pages – use the hashtag #glasgowkidstrails.

COVID UPDATE

Glasgow City Heritage Trust recognises that the Covid-19 outbreak is an exceptional event that will have an impact on our grantees, partners and stakeholders, and wants to offer reassurance that we are taking all measures possible to maintain continuity of service throughout this difficult time. 

From today, Wednesday 18th March 2020, our office will be closed and all staff will be working remotely. Our Grant Programmes remain open and all our other activities remain operational. Our Events Programme is taking place online via Zoom.

 These measures will be reviewed regularly, and any changes will be communicated via social media channels and our website. Staff are contactable by email. 

We wish to be as helpful as possible during the coming weeks and months so that our grantees can move ahead with their projects where possible, with the assurance that we will be supportive and understanding about changes that need to be made to their programmes in light of the current situation. 

We understand that there will be times when staff and volunteers will not be available, when events need to be cancelled or postponed, or when projects need to be flexible to ensure that outcomes are met and outputs delivered.

If your project or organisation are affected by the covid-19 outbreak, and you have accepted grant funding from us, we are committed to:

  • Adapting activities – we recognise that you may experience difficulties achieving some of the outputs or outcomes we agreed for your grant during the outbreak, and would like to be able to maintain our grant payments to you at originally-agreed levels during this period, so please have a conversation with us if you are affected in this way;
  • Discussing dates – we don’t want to add pressure, so if you think you will struggle to meet a deadline please get in touch with us so that we can agree a more realistic time for you to get work completed or things to us wherever possible;
  • Financial flexibility – we know you may need to adapt your projects and use your funding differently, and we will be reasonable if you need to move money between budget headings to ensure your work can continue; and
  • Listening to you – we are here if you want to talk to us about the situation you’re facing, but we’ll wait for you to contact us so that these conversations are at the right time for you.

If you have any questions or concerns please get in touch at info@glasgowheritage.org.uk or email your usual Grant Officer.

Tour: The Pyramid at Anderston

The Pyramid at Anderston on a sunny day

Friday 21 June 2024 | 18:30-20:00 | The Pyramid at Anderston, 759 Argyle Street, Glasgow G3 8DS

Step Inside the Pyramid: Where Community and History Meet

Have you ever wondered about the unique pyramid-shaped building in the heart of Glasgow? Now’s your chance to uncover its secrets! Join us for an exclusive tour inside this architectural marvel.

Back in the 1950s, the Church of Scotland promoted constructing less hierarchical church buildings, leading to an open-plan Modern design with Brutalist traits. This vision was brought to life by the architectural firm Honeyman, Jack & Robertson, resulting in the stunning Anderson Parish Church, now known as The Pyramid at Anderston.

Completed in 1968 as part of Anderston’s redevelopment, this distinctive structure houses twenty-two rooms used as meeting and workspaces, along with three spacious community halls, including the beautiful Sanctuary space with its distinctive shape and coloured stained glasses. From 1968 to 2019, the building operated as the Anderston Kelvingrove Parish Church. In 2018, a new chapter began with the formation of The Pyramid at Anderston Trust, a community membership organisation. A year later, with a grant from the Scottish Land Fund, the Trust purchased the building, ensuring it remained a vital community hub.

In June 2020, the Trust secured a £1.1 million award from the National Lottery Community Fund, kickstarting essential renovations. GCHT also provided a grant of £90,000 to work on the iconic reinforced concrete bell tower, some of the deep concrete fascia bands, and to an area of roof that corresponds to the main entrance foyer.

Join us for a one-hour tour to discover the history, architecture, and vibrant community spirit of The Pyramid. Refreshments will be served afterward in the beautiful and atmospheric Sanctuary space.

Step inside and be part of The Pyramid’s ongoing story!

£16 per person, booking essential.

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

CPD: Conservation Works at GoMA

A photograph of the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art

Thursday, 16th May | 1:00-2.00pm | Online via Zoom and In-Person at GCHT’s office on 54 Bell Street, Glasgow, G1 1LQ 

The Gallery of Modern Art is housed in one of Glasgow’s most distinctive buildings. Category A-Listed, it was originally built in 1778 and remains one of the city’s most important Georgian-era buildings. 

In this CPD, Scott Abercrombie of John Gilbert Architects will be discussing the recent works the practice has undertaken to repair and conserve the built fabric, as well as its history and significance as a building. 

Attendees will get to learn about the high-level stone repair and leadwork that John Gilbert are currently overseeing, and how they have coordinated this in conjunction with such a public-facing building. 

This event will be held both in-person at our office on 54 Bell Street, Glasgow (with light lunch provided) and streamed online via Zoom. Please pick the appropriate ticket option for you below.

£10 per person / £5 for students

 

All sessions are recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as being capable of contributing to the obligatory CPD requirements of Full Members (see www.ihbc.org.uk)

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Vacancy – Trustees

VOLUNTARY / UNPAID

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and grant funder. Through our grant programmes we enable projects which promote the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Opportunities are available to join our Board of Trustees in their strategic management of the Trust.

This is a fantastic opportunity for those looking to either build good CV-enhancing experience or simply devote some free time to make a valuable contribution to the running of a friendly, impactful and highly regarded charity.

Applications are sought from enthusiastic and innovative individuals with a passion for Glasgow’s historic environment. It would be particularly valuable to have new board members with FundraisingConservation Accredited Architecture or Surveying, Property Law or Accountancy expertise. Although we are primarily looking for experience in these areas, we welcome interest from all backgrounds and experience.

We encourage applications from all backgrounds, communities and industries, and are committed to having a Board of Directors that is made up of diverse skills, experiences and abilities. We are actively encourage BAME and disabled applicants and value the positive impact that difference has on our Board.

The roles are unremunerated and will require a commitment to attend quarterly Board meetings and additional sub-committee(s).

Time commitment:

  • 6-8 meetings per year.
  • Board meetings are held four times a year in March, June, September and December, always on a Wednesday afternoon for around two hours at our offices on Bell Street, Glasgow or via Zoom. The AGM is held directly after the September Board.
  • Trustees are expected to join at least one Sub-Committee, either Audit & Remuneration, Grants or Business Development. These Committees meet quarterly two or three weeks before each Board meeting on Wednesday afternoons for two hours, at our offices on Bell Street, Glasgow or via Zoom.
  • Each year, usually in September on a Wednesday, the Trustees and Employees hold a joint Strategic Away Day usually at a previously grant aided property or unusual venue in Glasgow to discuss the strategic direction for the next year followed by some external training and/or site visits to grant aided properties. This could be a 10am to 3-4 pm event.

Apply now:

To express an interest in joining the board, or for an informal conversation to find out more, please email a CV or a short summary of your skills, experience and interest in the role to Niall Murphy, Director, at niall@glasgowheritage.org.uk.

Workshop: Weave a Bird Feeder

A hanging willow bird feeder.

Wednesday 15 May 2024 | 6:30-8:30pm | The Wash House Garden, G31 4XA

Join us for a meditative outdoor weaving class. You’ll learn how to weave a fat ball bird feeder, using willow basketry methods dating back thousands of years. This is a perfect introduction to basketry.

Max Johnson is a longtime forager, community and market gardener and crafter. For Max, basketry is about connecting to our ancestral roots by weaving beauty out of what natural resources we have around us. Max is largely self-taught and believes basketry should be mindful, meditative, creative and fun. Max is a member of the Scottish Basketmakers Circle.

Suitable for beginners, no weaving experience necessary. All tools and materials are provided. Please note this event will be outdoors (although under a canopy), so please dress appropriately for the weather!

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Video Recording: Maps, Myths & Misrepresentations

In this fully illustrated talk, Map Curator Chris Fleet looks at various other things on maps that might never have been really out there, as well as how maps lie, distort the truth and miss things out. How far should we trust the map, and is this a good idea?

To access this post, you must purchase Become a Friend or Become a Fellow.

Video Recording: From Brides to The Bridewell: Women’s Lives in a Glasgow City Block

Join GCHT and Dr Nina Baker to look at what a particular street corner in the original heart of Glasgow tells us about the lives of the women who lived, worked and walked around it. Inspired by the redevelopment of a site near the corner of the High Street and Duke Street some years ago, Dr Baker has been investigating the history of this block and the range of buildings and uses it has had over the years, from manufacturing, housing, to commerce and social gatherings.

To access this post, you must purchase Become a Friend or Become a Fellow.

Recorded Talk: Mapping the City with John Moore

John Moore discusses Glasgow: Mapping the City, which explores how our amazing city has changed over the last 500 years. John’s beautifully illustrated book of the same name, published in 2015, features 80 specially selected maps, each offering a unique insight into the political, economic and social history of Glasgow. As the librarian of the University of Glasgow for nearly 38 years, Mr Moore was well acquainted with the city.

To access this post, you must purchase Become a Friend or Become a Fellow.

Recorded Talk: The Evolution of George Square with Niall Murphy

George Square – the heart of Glasgow and central to its identity but currently a place of intense social debate – it was ever thus… So, how did the square come into being, how has it evolved over three centuries, is there a pattern behind the locations of the monuments and why were their subjects selected for immortalisation in bronze? In this illustrated talk, Niall Murphy of Glasgow City Heritage Trust explains the background to the Square.

To access this post, you must purchase Become a Friend or Become a Fellow.

Recorded Talk: Atlantic Slavery Hidden in Plain Sight In A Victorian City

Thomas Sulman’s Bird’s Eye View of Glasgow (1864)is perhaps the most famous of all such views of British cities. The splendid, panoramic detail underlines Victorian Glasgow remained both commercial and industrial city: steam and sail ships sit on the Clyde at the Broomielaw, whilst the smog from new chemical industries compelled the affluent ranks to decant from the old ‘Merchant City’ to newer residences in the leafy west end. However, one of the major forces in Glasgow and Scotland’s shift from commerce to industry – transatlantic slavery – remains hidden in plain sight.

To access this post, you must purchase Become a Friend or Become a Fellow.

Recorded Talk: The TREE, the BIRD, the FISH, the BELL …and the PHOTOGRAPHER: Thomas Annan’s Glasgow

The photographer Thomas Annan (1829-1887) established his photographic business in Glasgow in 1857 and for the next thirty years documented the city at a time of exponential growth. His interest in the Second City of the Empire covered all areas: from the slum housing of the working classes and immigrants settled in the east end to the mansions and country houses of the wealthy landowners located in the suburbs. His photographs astutely recorded the city, its people and the social changes occurring during the second half of the nineteenth century.

To access this post, you must purchase Become a Friend or Become a Fellow.