News

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

We’ve already seen some lovely posts on social media with families out and about using our kids trails to guide them on their daily walk. So we thought we’d make the trails available online as downloads you can print out. Click on any of the images above and then you’ll be able to download and print the trails in a new easy-to-print format.

Of course it goes without saying that we hope you’ll enjoy these trails responsibly and make sure you keep your distance from other people out enjoying some fresh air – at least 2 metres away please!

We’d love to see some pictures of you enjoying the trails – you can show them to us on our Twitter, Instagram or Facebook pages – use the hashtag #glasgowkidstrails.

COVID UPDATE

Glasgow City Heritage Trust recognises that the Covid-19 outbreak is an exceptional event that will have an impact on our grantees, partners and stakeholders, and wants to offer reassurance that we are taking all measures possible to maintain continuity of service throughout this difficult time. 

From today, Wednesday 18th March 2020, our office will be closed and all staff will be working remotely. Our Grant Programmes remain open and all our other activities remain operational. Our Events Programme is taking place online via Zoom.

 These measures will be reviewed regularly, and any changes will be communicated via social media channels and our website. Staff are contactable by email. 

We wish to be as helpful as possible during the coming weeks and months so that our grantees can move ahead with their projects where possible, with the assurance that we will be supportive and understanding about changes that need to be made to their programmes in light of the current situation. 

We understand that there will be times when staff and volunteers will not be available, when events need to be cancelled or postponed, or when projects need to be flexible to ensure that outcomes are met and outputs delivered.

If your project or organisation are affected by the covid-19 outbreak, and you have accepted grant funding from us, we are committed to:

  • Adapting activities – we recognise that you may experience difficulties achieving some of the outputs or outcomes we agreed for your grant during the outbreak, and would like to be able to maintain our grant payments to you at originally-agreed levels during this period, so please have a conversation with us if you are affected in this way;
  • Discussing dates – we don’t want to add pressure, so if you think you will struggle to meet a deadline please get in touch with us so that we can agree a more realistic time for you to get work completed or things to us wherever possible;
  • Financial flexibility – we know you may need to adapt your projects and use your funding differently, and we will be reasonable if you need to move money between budget headings to ensure your work can continue; and
  • Listening to you – we are here if you want to talk to us about the situation you’re facing, but we’ll wait for you to contact us so that these conversations are at the right time for you.

If you have any questions or concerns please get in touch at info@glasgowheritage.org.uk or email your usual Grant Officer.

Vacancy: Heritage Officer- Activities (Maternity Cover)

Heritage Officer (full-time, fixed term, maternity cover)

Salary: £21,000 p/a

Glasgow City Heritage Trust gives out almost £1 million in funding each year to help people in Glasgow protect, repair and promote the city’s historic buildings and places.

Through our conservation grants people enjoy, understand and care for Glasgow’s historic built environment and are able to access funding and expertise which ensures the sustainability of the city’s heritage for current and future generations. 

Our historic environment plays an important role in successful neighbourhoods and high streets which are vital as a local point for social and economic interactions and sustainable communities.

An exciting opportunity has become available for an Activities Officer to support the implementation of the Trust’s new Historic Built Environment Activities programme for the benefit of all people living, working in and visiting Glasgow. As part of our Activities Team, this will involve the planning and co-ordination of a range of events, including talks and debates, tours, practical workshops and training opportunities for both a professional audience and the general public. You will also assist with a number of other projects designed to achieve our strategic objectives, such as community engagement workshops.

You will have an informed interest in Glasgow’s heritage and relevant experience in events management, project management, community engagement or similar, which may include a formal qualification. 

The successful candidate will manifest our core values: passionate, collaborative, innovative and forward-looking.

The Trust offers a variety of benefits to employees, including generous employer pension contributions, flexible working, 25 days paid annual leave and excellent opportunities for training and development. 

GCHT welcomes applications from all sections of the community and is an equal opportunities employer.

Heritage Officer- Activities (Maternity Cover) Job Description

Heritage Officer- Activities (Maternity Cover) Application for Employment

To apply please use the links above to download the Job Description and Application Form.

Application forms should be returned by email to info@glasgowheritage.org.uk.

Deadline for applications: Friday 29th July 2022 at 12 noon. Shortlisted candidates will be informed by Friday 5th August 2022.

Interviews: Friday, 12 August 2022.

Please don’t hesitate to contact the Director Torsten Haak via torsten@glasgowheritage.org.uk to arrange an informal discussion about the role.

CPD: Upgrading a Traditional Tenement Building

Interior image of a bay window in a flat with wood fibre insulation added

Thursday 14th July 2022 | 12.30-1.30pm | via Zoom 

In this CPD, Chris Morgan of John Gilbert Architects will be discussing the current works being done to upgrade a traditional Glaswegian tenement building on Niddrie Road to meet the EnerPHit standard. 

The project, commissioned by Southside Housing Association, aims to demonstrate an approach that rigorously tackles energy efficiency and fuel poverty whilst also addressing issues related to health and well-being as well as heritage, building maintenance and management. 

Attendees will get to learn about the works being undertaken, explore the innovative monitoring and 3D scans the team has been doing, and hear what the project means for helping Scotland’s historic housing stock tackle the climate crisis.

Chris Morgan is an architect and a Director at John Gilbert Architects with over 30 years’ experience in ecological design and sustainable development. He has maintained a range of experience from masterplanning and energy infrastructure, through to award-winning and innovative architecture, research and teaching. Previously a Chair of the Scottish Ecological Design Association, Chris is one of only four architects with advanced sustainable architecture accreditation from the RIAS. He is a design review panellist for Architecture + Design Scotland and has certification in Passivhaus design, building biology and permaculture.

The CPD will be recorded and available to all ticket holders after the event.

£15 per person / £10 for students.

Details Price Qty
Standard Ticket £15.00 (GBP)  
Student Ticket £10.00 (GBP)  

 

All sessions are recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as being capable of contributing to the obligatory CPD requirements of Full Members (see www.ihbc.org.uk)

We are using Zoom to broadcast our live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

We aim to make our events as accessible as possible but if you feel that you might need some additional help, please let us know when you book your ticket or get in touch in advance. We’re open to feedback and would welcome your ideas on how we can improve in this area.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

In Person Tour and Talk: Exploring Historic Interiors at Holmwood House **Sold Out**

**Sold Out** Wednesday 6th July 2022 | 6pm to 9pm | Holmwood House | 61-63 Netherlee Rd, Glasgow G44 3YU

Join us for an exciting night in the exclusive venue of Holmwood House, one of the most architecturally significant historic villas in Scotland, owned by the National Trust for Scotland. The night will consists of an in person tour of the house and a lecture on historic interiors and wallpapers.

The one hour in person tour will be led by National Trust for Scotland Visitor Service Manager, Ana Sanchez De la Vega, and will be followed by a fascinating talk about historic interiors and wallpapers, by National Trust for Scotland Curator Emma Inglis. Refreshments will be provided.

Located in the Southside of Glasgow, Holmwood House was designed by Scottish architect Alexander “Greek” Thomson, whose profound influence can still be detected everywhere in the city. This masterfully designed family home has impressed visitors for decades with its carefully curated design, and it is widely regarded as the architect’s finest domestic creation.

Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson first designed the villa for paper magnate James Couper and his wife in 1857–8, and the architect’s penchant for Grecian styling and symmetry is found throughout the villa, where the bold opulent decoration echoes the colours seen in ancient Greek temples.

The tour will focus on the relationship between Thomson, Holmwood House and Glasgow, and give you an opportunity to learn about the legacy of his creative genius.

After the tour you will be invited to join NTS Curator Emma Inglis for a talk on historic interiors. The talk will explore two hundred years of wallpapers and major fashions and influences; from the exquisite Chinese papers of the 1720s to the mass produced patterns of the 1920s.

Emma Inglis is a curator for the National Trust for Scotland, and works with multi-disciplinary property teams to deliver interpretation projects, interior redecoration schemes, temporary exhibition programming and creative use of collections. She is involved in the research of collections and interiors, with a particular interest in domestic textiles, eighteenth and nineteenth century social history, and decorative interiors.

Booking essential 

Refreshments included in the price 

£18 per person, £14 concession

Details Price Qty
Standard Ticket £18.00 (GBP)   Sold Out
Concession Ticket (Student, Senior) £14.00 (GBP)   Sold Out

Please note: Payment is taken via PayPal but you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay online. 

We are using Zoom to broadcast our on line live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

All events are subtitled. We aim to make our events as accessible as possible but if you feel that you might need some additional help, please let us know when you book your ticket or get in touch in advance. We’re open to feedback and would welcome your ideas on how we can improve in this area.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

All events are recorded and everyone who has booked will be sent a link to the recording to watch again after the event. We are a small team and this can take a couple of weeks so please bear with us!

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

Online Talk: A Bird’s-Eye View of the Development of Glasgow University: The Gilbert Scott Building

Wednesday 22nd June 2022 | 7.30pm BST | via Zoom

Taking Thomas Sulman’s 1864 bird’s-eye view of Glasgow as a starting point, this talk will explore a pivotal period in the history of development of both the city and the University. As Sulman’s balloon drifted above the city, the University was already planning its flight from the congested and polluted High Street site to the then rural Arcadia of Gilmorehill.

Using contemporary 19th-century photographs, engravings and paintings, Nick Haynes will guide us around the extraordinary complex of 17th-, 18th- and 19th- century buildings in the Old College, and set the scene for the construction of Scotland’s largest Gothic building on Gilmorehill.

Nick Haynes is a historic environment consultant, author and amateur photographer, who has recently joined property consultancy Montagu Evans as their Heritage Partner for Scotland. In 2013 he wrote the book Building Knowledge – An Archtectural History of Glasgow University, following the story of the Old College buildings in the High Street, through Gilbert Scott’s great palace of learning on Gilmorehill, to the newer adjoining campus at Hillhead.

Free, booking required, donations welcome. 

We're sorry, but all tickets sales have ended because the event is expired.

Please note: Payment is taken via PayPal but you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay online. 

We are using Zoom to broadcast our live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

All events are subtitled. We aim to make our events as accessible as possible but if you feel that you might need some additional help, please let us know when you book your ticket or get in touch in advance. We’re open to feedback and would welcome your ideas on how we can improve in this area.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

All events are recorded and everyone who has booked will be sent a link to the recording to watch again after the event. We are a small team and this can take a couple of weeks so please bear with us!

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

Workshop: Stained Glass

Two pieces of stained glass art with a black leaded outline and primary coloured geometric shapes

Saturday 11th June 2022 | 10am-5pm | Jangling Space, Unit H, Shawlands Arcade, Kilmarnock Road, Glasgow G41 3RS 

Join us for this this all-day workshop, where participants will get a chance to learn about the art of stained glass and get to grips with how to cut, lead, and solder their first piece. Everyone will get to design, create, and take home their own piece of stained glass art based on Jangling Spaces’s popular “Weir Pumps” design, inspired by an aerial view of the Weir Pumps of Cathcart. 

The workshop will be facilitated by Jangling Space at their studio in the Shawlands Arcade. Jangling Space is a cooperative makerspace on the Southside of Glasgow focused on making glass art influenced by the city’s heritage. 

The ticket price includes all materials and lunch. 

Please note this is an in-person event and current Covid guidance will be complied with. 

We're sorry, but all tickets sales have ended because the event is expired.

Please note: Payment is taken via PayPal but you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay online. 

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

A Runaway Horse, Shoplifting and a ‘Peace Riot’

By Morag Cross

Are there women in Sulman’s aerial perspective of Glasgow?

Yes, they inhabit, own and work in the buildings he shows. The amazing image can been used to show the surroundings where female entrepreneurs and employers, shopkeepers and factory workers, lived, loved and laboured. There is no shortage of stories about women’s lives, as this second blog by Morag Cross also shows.

Sulman's map of 1864 showing the location of Queen Arcade

A RUNAWAY HORSE

Queen Arcade was an indoors ‘safe space’ for women to meet and browse, reassured by the benign surveillance of fellow shoppers. One morning in 1866, this security was breached by a runaway horse, which collided with an unsuspecting female, and careered through both the Queen and Wellington Arcades.    

Traders in close proximity can also attract less desirable human visitors – in 1866, illiterate Ann Mills received ‘seven years’ penal servitude’ for stealing corsets and 5 yards of coarse cloth from Jane Collins’s shop. Mills had 8 previous convictions including 4 years for theft, an obvious measure of her desperation when the harsh punishments didn’t put her off. The National Records of Scotland’s online catalogue reveals Mills was a musician’s wife from Belfast, living in the congested slums of Bridgegate. The street was known for its large Irish community, and numerous used-clothing dealers, where Mills could have sold her goods for ready cash. Corset-maker Mrs Collins and her extended family featured in the previous blog. Mary Jane Dobbins, a cousin-by-marriage, was targeted in 1871 by Mary Wilson, another repeat offender. Wilson took ’32 yards of jean cloth and a crinoline’, and served 8 months in prison.  She was obviously unable to conceal so much bulky material about her person, and like Mills, probably lived a chaotic, miserable existence. 

This blue silk crinoline dress was worn by one of the Reids of Kittochside Farm, East Kilbride c 1866-7. It was supported by a hooped cage or frame, like that shown (Images courtesy Glasgow Museums, CC BY-SA 4.0).

A MARVEL OF MISDIRECTION

Crinoline frames were made in arcade workshops; seamstress Mrs Mary Ann Stirling advertised in 1861 as ‘inventress of the hand notted [sic] crinoline … keeps the shape better … also much cheaper’. Twice widowed, she concealed her true age and first marriage from her third husband – three marriages might seem embarrassingly excessive. Her death certificate, from 1900, is a marvel of misdirection – she had obviously knocked three years off her age, falsified her mother’s and second spouse’s names, and omitted ‘Mr Stirling’ altogether. She can never have expected to be found out! 

Mrs Stirling’s invention, advertised in the Glasgow Herald of February, 1861

DEATH BY CRINOLINE

Unwieldy crinolines frames were absurdly impractical and also dangerous –gruesome ‘death by crinoline’ was often reported, where the extended skirts were ignited by naked flames. Fanny Appleton, wife of the poet H W Longfellow, was one such victim. ‘Crinoline protector’ guards were even sold with cooking ranges. A wonderfully vivid account of the Glasgow public touring the warship ‘Centurion’ in 1861, relates: ‘Ladies were crushing their crinolines into gigantic sandwiches amid coils of rope, barrels and pails’. One woman descending a ladder was unable to see her feet, until a ‘gallant sailor … crushed every reef out of the floating crinoline’. 

 Queen Arcade’s female traders largely depended on meeting the demands of home dressmakers who pursued the latest elaborate styles. Those on modest budgets would normally update collars, flounces or decoration on existing clothing, as new outfits were a major investment. Dress-accessories and haberdashery provided an entire branch of retail for women workers, which vanished as braid and long hems were replaced by mass-produced clothing after World War 1. There were at least four of these miniature emporiums in the arcade over time, under specialist names like ‘furnishings’, ‘smallwares’, and ‘fancy warehouses’.  

Adverts from the various 'small wares' shops, Glasgow Herald 1870s
The disturbingly contemporary letter below appeared next to a review of the new shopping facilities in Queen Arcade (North British Daily Mail, 8 December 1875).

A BEWILDERING VARIETY OF EVERY COMMODITY

Esther Smith (born Caithness, 1805) saved enough working as a servant to open an arcade toyshop in the mid-1850s. She expanded her stock to ‘furnishings’ while hosting her teenage nephew, an apprentice plasterer. One of the Martin staymaker family lodged with her in 1871 (showing the inter-dependency of the arcade women’s household incomes), and ten years later, presumably retired, she was living with her niece, another ‘smallware dealer’ from Caithness. Something soon went tragically wrong – her 1883 death certificate calls her a ‘pauper’. 

 Mrs Stirling, discussed above, sold ‘dress furnishings’, and contemporary adverts show this might include endless varieties of hairnets, stamped and velvet ribbons (all widths), steel buckles, trimmings, silk and worsted yarns, milliner’s feathers, jet and nickel buttons, eyelets, fringes, jacket ornaments, veil nets, and ‘plated portrait brooches’. The bewildering varieties of every commodity demonstrate the minute subdivision of labour, and global import market – German sundries being especially noted.  

A ‘DECIDEDLY DINGY PASSAGE’ 

The mall (opened c1842), was a shabby, ‘decidedly dingy passage’ by the 1870s. Paint merchant Andrew Yuille bought the entire complex and invested in the necessary renovations in 1875. The floor was ‘rodent-proofed’ with asphalt, and mosaics of the city’s arms. ‘Unusually liberal use of silverised plate glass and gilding’ included huge etched mirrors over the entrances. The new roof was 12 feet higher, allowing for white and gold pillared shopfronts (with more mirrors), beneath ornamental gargoyle heads. The architects were Knox & Halley, with paint schemes by local artist T Byron Lyle and decorator James Lyle. The latter’s widow, Agnes, opened her own paint store at the wonderfully-named 265½ Buchanan St in the 1880s. 

Traces of the elaborate interior survived into the final days of the mall in the early 1960s. The empty mirror frames, carved gargoyles and ‘rat-proof’ flooring remained. Courtesy of Glasgow City Archives, Cat No D-PL 2/1/1871.

A VANITY-CENTRED MARKETING PLOY

At the celebratory dance for the tenants, the speaker praised ‘all those beautiful mirrors which so faithfully reflected ladies’ charms as they passed.’ When word of this looking-glass hall spread, ladies would flock to examine (or admire) themselves, and ‘shopkeepers could secure them as customers and … extract the needful profit’. The decoration was a vanity-centred marketing ploy, although most women were presumably canny enough to resist! The glaziers, J & G Rae, later supplied glass for the famous C R Mackintosh-designed Willow Tearooms. 

 Some women were granted the vote in school board and municipal elections in 1872, and 1881 respectively. It’s a mystery why these major feminist landmarks are never celebrated, and only 1918 is recognised for female suffrage. In 1881, under the new property qualification, three female ratepayers in Queen Arcade appear on the ‘List of Female persons entitled … to vote for town councillors’. They were corset-makers Isabella and Mary Jane Dobbin, and Janet Sommerville, who ran dairies in and around the arcade for 32 years. She was another of those unsung spinster aunts, who brought up her nephew and worked until her seventies. In turn, Janet was cared for by his family, received the newly-introduced state pension in 1908, and died at the great age of 90 in 1922.  

Adverts from the rise of Joseph Broydo’s firm, Helensburgh News 1884 and his fall, Glasgow Herald 1885

IT ENDED IN A RIOT..

The 1885 rateable valuation roll shows that ‘Elizabeth Broydo & Co’ owned a portrait studio. This was still a rare job for a woman, although one of history’s most celebrated female photographers – Clementina Elphinstone Fleeming (1822-65), later Lady Hawarden, came from nearby Cumbernauld. Joseph Broydo, an emigre Russian picture-framer, had married Elizabeth Morgan from County Down. He had four studios in Glasgow and Belfast, and even spoke at Irish home-rule meetings. When Broydo faced bankruptcy, the premises were put in Elizabeth’s name. Joseph’s fate is unknown, but Elizabeth re-emerges back in Newry in 1896. During a volatile sibling dispute, she accused her own brother of assault and withholding her wages, but settled out of court.  

We began with a bolting horse, and end with a riot. Two sisters, the Misses Ronald, had occupied the double shop at Nos 1-3 as mantle-makers (short, loose coats). The new tenant in 1899 was one James Keir Hardie, former and future MP, co-founder of the Labour Party, but at that time, editor of the ‘Labour Leader’ newspaper.  

 The Glasgow Herald described a rally against the Boer War (attended by Hardie) in March 1900 as ‘a travelling troupe of Stop-the-War propagandists’, who ‘slandered the nation’. Counter-demonstrators smashed Hardie’s plate-glass office windows in Queen Arcade, such was the depth of feeling on both sides. Hardie claimed £16 damages for repairs, which the city council refused to pay. The so-called (and self-contradictory) ‘peace riot’ ends this brief saunter past the women’s lives among one of Glasgow’s early shopping malls. Their imposing architecture has been justly celebrated, but the feminine social worlds contained therein also deserve a hearing. Meanwhile, Sulman has microscopic pedestrians traversing his streets, some of them wearing crinolines, which make them identifiable as women, although cartography was surely never envisaged as a reason to wear them! 

Morag Cross is an independent researcher and archaeologist, specialising in histories of buildings and land ownership. Her archival research explores the unexpected links between previously unknown figures, especially women, and their social networks. She has worked on over 80 projects including business histories for the Mackintosh Architecture website, Glasgow Council’s official WW1 website, M74 industrial archaeology research, and Edinburgh’s India Buildings, Victoria St.

WANT TO KNOW MORE? 

  • Read the first blog about Queen Arcade here
  • Check out our Gallus Glasgow map and explore more stories of the Victorian city. Once there, why not add a few stories of your own?
  • Prints of the map are available to buy in our online shop

CPD: Accessibility in the Historic Environment

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

"No Access" sign on wooden fence, on green background

Wednesday 25th May 2022 | 12.30-1.30pm | GCHT Zoom Meeting

Historic buildings and heritage spaces make up a major part of our housing, offices, commercial and recreations spaces. Unfortunately, a lot of these buildings are inaccessible to disabled people, creating barriers to housing, employment, and the enjoyment and appreciation of heritage, culture and art.

What can we do to create spaces that are truly accessible and inclusive of everyone? What makes a space and experience accessible and what are the steps to achieve this status?

In this CPD, Emily Yates, Head of Accessibility and Inclusive Design at Mima, will discuss disability and the historic built environment, regulations for accessible buildings, what sort of adjustments might be needed in a historic building, and how to make adjustments that don’t cause hardship to the user or exclude them.

A great believer in inclusive end-to end experiences that benefit both the user and staff member, Emily has experience of auditing transport networks (Rio 2016 and Northern Rail), and football stadiums (Watford, Liverpool, West Ham). She has also delivered disability awareness training sessions (Dubai Expo 2020), digital access audits and created inclusive policies and standards for organisations to improve their internal and external accessibility (Heathrow Airport, National Railway Museum).

The CPD will be recorded and available to all ticket holders after the event.

£15 per person / £10 for students.

We're sorry, but all tickets sales have ended because the event is expired.

 

All sessions are recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as being capable of contributing to the obligatory CPD requirements of Full Members (see www.ihbc.org.uk)

We are using Zoom to broadcast our live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

We aim to make our events as accessible as possible but if you feel that you might need some additional help, please let us know when you book your ticket or get in touch in advance. We’re open to feedback and would welcome your ideas on how we can improve in this area.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Online Talk: From Brides to The Bridewell: Women’s Lives in a Glasgow City Block

Sepia image of Victorian Glasgow
Image © of Mitchell Library, Glasgow City Council

From Brides to The Bridewell: Women’s Lives in a Glasgow City Block

Thursday 12th May 2022 | 7.30pm | via Zoom

Join GCHT and Dr Nina Baker to look at what a particular street corner in the original heart of Glasgow tells us about the lives of the women who lived, worked and walked around it. 

Inspired by the redevelopment of a site near the corner of the High Street and Duke Street some years ago, Dr Baker has been investigating the history of this block and the range of buildings and uses it has had over the years, from manufacturing, housing, to commerce and social gatherings. She will discuss how she has used modern recorded data to draw out hints of how life was for ordinary women from the early 19th century onwards, and what two of the site’s most significant buildings – the marriage registry office and Bridewell Women’s Prison – represented to these women and the society in which they lived. 

Dr Nina Baker is an independent historian researching the history of women in engineering. She has had a varied career, starting with being a Merchant Navy Deck Officer before gaining an engineering design degree in her 30s, followed by a PhD in concrete durability from the University of Liverpool. She has lived with her family in Glasgow since 1989, and was a Glasgow City Councillor from 2007-17. She has recently published a biography of the aeronautical engineer, Hilda Lyon: Adventures in Aeronautical design. The life of Hilda M. Lyon.

Free, booking required, donations welcome. 

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You might also be interested in…

Online Talk: 19th Century Retail and the Rise of the Department Store

Wednesday 8th December 2021 | 7.30pm GMT | via Zoom

Focusing on architecture, window displays, and internal design, this talk will examine how Glasgow department stores, like their Parisian counterparts, became spaces not just of spectacle, but also of manipulation and disorientation.

The Map

“I feel like a bird soaring over the city when I gaze upon Sulman’s map, every nook and cranny with every detail so exact.

I can see where I came from and where I’m at.”

Edward’s story

A DIFFERENT DIRECTION Another day at the warehouse done. He’s a clerk, so there’s always lots of paperwork to get through and it requires great attention to detail. He’s a conscientious and well-organised individual though, so he enjoys it and the satisfaction he gets when a job is done well. 

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Black Victorians and Uncle Tom’s Cabin in Glasgow

By Caroline Bressey

Uncle Tom's Cabin print, 1878, Library of Congress collection

AN UNPRECEDENTED SUCCESS

On Thursday 26 February 1880 an advert was placed to catch the attention of readers of Glasgow’s Evening Citizen.  Carried among the ads for ‘amusements’ that could be enjoyed that week was one for Uncle Tom’s Cabin, then showing at the Prince of Wales Theatre.  The show was being met with ‘thunders of applause’ every night, and consisted of a ‘magnificent dramatic company’ which included American comedians, ‘original jubilee singers’ (a choir of African American singers) and ‘freed slaves’.   It was claimed to be an unprecedented success in the history of drama in Glasgow.  The theatre promised that overflow tickets issued on a Saturday evening when some hundreds were unable to get in would be available any evening during the show’s run.  The following week, perhaps to ensure that potential audience members were aware of the authenticity of the cast, another ad carried the additional tag that the cast included ‘real negroes’.  

Harriet Beecher Stowe

‘TOO WELL KNOWN TO DEMAND COMMENT’

Readers of the Citizen would likely have known well the story of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, though it had been published almost 30 years earlier.  When an 1872 production opened in Glasgow, the story was deemed ‘too well known to demand comment.’ Published by Harriet Beecher Stowe in Boston in 1852, the book became one of the most important and best-selling novels of the nineteenth century.  When it was printed in London in 1852, it was given a slightly different title: Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or Negro Life in the Slave States of America, making clear its central concern with the lives of enslaved African Americans. 

The book was a sensation in Britain and was read and performed in many different settings.  In February 1857 the Glasgow Courier carried an announcement that for 3s a ticket, audiences would be able to hear Mrs Webb, ‘a coloured American Lady’, reading from Uncle Tom’s Cabin at the McLellan Rooms that Friday evening.  Given the immense popularity and success of the novel, it is not surprising theatre producers sought to capitalise on interest in the story, and versions of Uncle Tom’s Cabin remained popular on theatre programmes in Britain for the remainder of the century.  

The first stage productions opened in the United States in August 1852, but Britain was not far behind with adaptations at the Standard and Olympic Theatres in London and the Theatre Royal in Edinburgh all opening in September.  It’s likely the first stage version in Glasgow was produced not long afterwards.  Certainly by February 1853 the Theatre Royal, then on Dunlop Street, was boasting in an advert placed in the Glasgow Free Press, that a crowded house watched their version of the show every night.  Its popularity was such that Uncle Tom’s Cabin was programmed to be performed every night until further notice. 

McLellan Galleries, Sauchiehall Street, c. 1920

SPECTACULAR THEATRICAL VERSIONS

The 1870s saw one of the most spectacular theatrical versions created by the American producers Jarrett and Palmer. In 1878 they announced a new kind of staging of the novel which would involve a vast cast including over 50 Black actors.  Though the entire version of this American staging did not perform in Glasgow, a chorus of Jubilee singers joined a production which played to crowded and enthusiastic audiences at the Prince of Wales theatre.  A February 1879 review in the North British Daily Mail (Scotland’s first daily newspaper) commended all aspects of the work particularly the ‘singing and dancing of the bona fide Jubilee Singers’ who the reviewer felt, invested the play ‘with a realism totally beyond ordinary expectations.’

The reviewer’s highlighting of the Jubilee singers’ authenticity illustrates the complex relationship Black performers and hopeful actors surely had with the staging of the novel.  The play offered important roles in the careers of actresses who found strong and serious roles adapted from white characters in the novel.  With Black women also key characters in the novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin could provide stage roles for Black women, but often white actresses and actors took all the main parts.  In some productions Black actresses could find parts playing more minor roles, and in time Uncle Tom himself would be played by Black actors.  

 

OTHER ROLES FOR BLACK PERFORMERS

Enduring productions throughout the 1880s and 1890s generated ongoing advertisements for ‘Coloured people’ and ‘Jubilee singers’ to join shows across the country, but though Uncle Tom’s Cabin provided roles for Black performers they were undoubtedly being asked to perform very particular ideas of Blackness in these plays.  Yet, these weren’t the only parts available for Black people seeking to make a living upon the stage.  The African American performer Amy Height did take on parts in Uncle Tom’s Cabin in England, but she also performed at the Gaiety Theatre on Sauchiehall Street in December 1892, when she was billed as a ‘Coloured American Songstress’.  Known as a comedian and soprano, she also performed as a ‘negro ballad singer’ at the Scotia Variety Theatre on Stockwell Street.  

In September 1899, the Royal Princess Theatre in Glasgow placed an advertisement for: ‘a Coloured Lady for Comedy Part in Pantomime’.  Anyone interested was to send their terms, a photo and further particulars to Mr Waldon – presumably Rich Waldon, manager of the theatre from the 1880s.  Of course, the placing of an advertisement does not prove that a Black woman appeared in a pantomime at the Princess Theatre that year.   The advertisement does tell us that Black performers were out there, looking for and hoping for work, travelling around the country, having their photographs taken for potential employers and sometimes treading the boards of Glasgow’s theatres.  While they did so they would have become part of the city’s community of jobbing performers, entertaining audiences, and off stage sharing rooms and stories with fellow actors before moving on, or perhaps settling down.  If they did stay, which parts of Victorian Glasgow they made home is still to be recovered.

 

 

Caroline Bressey is an historical and cultural geographer at University College London.  Her research focuses upon the Black presence in Victorian Britain and how our histories are represented in heritage sites.  Her book, Empire, Race and the politics of Anti-Caste examined a radical anti-racist reading community established by Catherine Impey in 1888.  

WANT TO KNOW MORE?

  • Explore our Gallus Glasgow map, featuring several theatres.
  • Prints of the map are available to buy in our online shop
  • The Arthur Lloyd website has comprehensive information on Glasgow’s theatres.

You might also be interested in…

Online Talk: 19th Century Retail and the Rise of the Department Store

Wednesday 8th December 2021 | 7.30pm GMT | via Zoom

Focusing on architecture, window displays, and internal design, this talk will examine how Glasgow department stores, like their Parisian counterparts, became spaces not just of spectacle, but also of manipulation and disorientation.

The Map

“I feel like a bird soaring over the city when I gaze upon Sulman’s map, every nook and cranny with every detail so exact.

I can see where I came from and where I’m at.”

Edward’s story

A DIFFERENT DIRECTION Another day at the warehouse done. He’s a clerk, so there’s always lots of paperwork to get through and it requires great attention to detail. He’s a conscientious and well-organised individual though, so he enjoys it and the satisfaction he gets when a job is done well. 

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Vacancy: Heritage Manager (Maternity Cover)

Three people wearing high viz jackets stand in front of a building covered in scaffolding

Heritage Manager (part-time / maternity cover)

3 days/week starting June 2022

£30,000 pro rata (£18,000) including Local Government Pension Scheme

Glasgow City Heritage Trust gives out almost £1 million in funding each year to help people in Glasgow protect, repair and promote the city’s historic buildings and places.

Through our conservation grants people enjoy, understand and care for Glasgow’s historic built environment and are able to access funding and expertise which ensures the sustainability of the city’s heritage for current and future generations. 

Our historic environment plays an important role in successful neighbourhoods and high streets which are vital as a local point for social and economic interactions and sustainable communities.

We have an exciting opportunity for a Heritage Manager (Maternity Cover) to join our team in the administration, and management of our Grants Programme in Glasgow aimed at historic building repairs, project development and heritage outreach and education work.

The 2022/23 Historic Environment Grants budget is just under £620,000. As the Heritage Manager you will take overall responsibility for the delivery of the new grants process, and management of a small team of Heritage Officers. You will work alongside the Heritage Manager responsible for the Trust’s Heritage Activities and will report to the Deputy Director and Grants Committee. 

You will have an informed interest in Glasgow’s heritage and will have relevant experience in a heritage, arts or culture organisation. 

The successful candidate will manifest our core values: passionate, collaborative, innovative and forward-looking.

The Trust offers a variety of benefits to employees, including generous employer pension contributions, flexible working, 25 days paid annual leave (pro rata) and excellent opportunities for training and development. 

GCHT welcomes applications from all sections of the community and is an equal opportunities employer.

For further details or to apply, please go to www.glasgowheritage.org.uk. Please don’t hesitate to contact the Director Torsten Haak via torsten@glasgowheritage.org.uk to arrange an informal discussion. 

The deadline for application submission is 25th April 2022 at 12:00 noon. Shortlisted candidates will be informed by 29th April 2022. Interviews will be held on 5th May 2022 via Zoom.

Heritage Manager (Maternity Cover) Job Description

Heritage Manager (Maternity Cover) Application for Employment