Feature: An Introduction to Traditional Sign Writing

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GCHT grantees Lindsay and Simone opened their store “The Bridal Courtyard” in 2021. With the help of GCHT Traditional Skills funding, they employed traditional sign writers Scott and Ross Hastie to create beautiful, hand painted signage on their shop window. Lindsay and Simone interviewed Scott and Ross to find out more about their craft! Check out the video below to see Ross in action and learn more about his craft and how his journey into his fascinating career.

Lindsay and Simone’s vision: “Our aim at the Bridal Courtyard was to remove the purple vinyl machine made logo on our main window and bring our signage back to a formal Victorian glory, in keeping with the Italiante style Tannery Building in which we are housed. Therefore, we employed Ross to create Traditional gold leaf signage.”

Window Signage Before:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Window Signage After:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The artist, Ross Hastie: Ross takes inspiration from the spectrum of traditional and contemporary design. His colour choices, lettering styles and effects are carefully chosen for each individual project. He considers styles and trends correct to the intended era, and aims to be in keeping with established themes in each individual project.

The Project Team:

To find out more about Traditional Skills grants, check out our Guidance Notes.

 

An Interview with Traditional Sign Writers Scott & Ross Hastie Recorded at “The Bridal Courtyard” in April 2021.

Visit the Bridal Courtyard: www.bridalcourtyard.com

Follow The Bridal Courtyard on Instagram: @thebridalcourtyard

Visit Ross Hastie Signs: www.rosshastiesigns.com

Follow Ross Hastie Signs on Instagram: @rosshastiesigns

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Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Grants Workshops

Would you like to know more about how GCHT’s grants scheme works? If you are thinking of applying for a grant but don’t know where to start, then you are in the right place! 

“I can thoroughly recommend the support from GCHT - they supported us all the way!”

Between September 2020 and March 2021, GCHT ran a series of workshops which offered a step by step guide to applying for our grants. Each event featured a short presentation focused on eligibility and the application process, followed by two guest speakers who spoke about past projects. Speakers included a range of past grantees as well as GCHT Officers. Each workshop ended with a Q&A session and general discussion.

“Many thanks to GCHT and the speakers - Colin's case study was interesting and applicable to a lot of Glasgow legacy buildings.”
“It’s been a super interesting meeting, thank you very much!"

The subtitled recordings of the events are now available to watch online for free:

Workshop 1: Building Repair & Traditional Skills Grants

Recorded 10th December 2020.

Speakers:

Building Repair Grant: Colin Baillie, Baillie Baillie Architects

Traditional Skills Grant: Gemma Park, GCHT Traditional Skills Officer

Workshop 2: Heritage and Community Grants

Recorded 11th February 2021.

Speakers:

Heritage Grant: Jan Graham, Ghost Signs of Glasgow

Community Grant: Lizanne Phee, TnmntTiles

Workshop 3: Building Repair and Development Grants

Recorded 31st March 2021.

Speakers:

Building Repair Grant: Fiona Sinclair, RIAS Conservation Accredited Architect at Advanced level

Development Grant: Shireen Taylor, GAMIS (Govanhill Picture House)

You might also be interested in...

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Workshop 1: Building Repair & Traditional Skills Grants

Between September 2020 and March 2021, GCHT ran a series of workshops which offered a step by step guide to applying for our grants. Each event featured a short presentation focused on eligibility and the application process, followed by two guest speakers who spoke about past projects. Speakers included a range of past grantees as well as GCHT Officers. Each workshop ended with a Q&A session and general discussion. 

Recorded 10th December 2020.

Speakers:

Building Repair Grant: Colin Baillie, Baillie Baillie Architects
Traditional Skills Grant: Gemma Park, GCHT Traditional Skills Officer

During this event we explored our Building Repair Grant with architect Colin Baillie who, together with the other building owners, managed to secure a grant to repair the gable end of their tenement, which had been damaged by inappropriate remedial work in the past.

Colin explained: “One of the most difficult aspects of maintaining a tenement building is generating enough support from co-owners to be able to take action. With 12 occupiers in the building we were a little daunted by this at first. I would encourage others to start talking to neighbours about the issues in a constructive way. Organise a get together and make a plan. It’s surprising and encouraging to discover how receptive others may be.”

Our second speaker was GCHT Traditional Skills Officer Gemma Park, who highlighted two grants: one involving a traditional shopfront and sign writing for a bridal shop, and the other focusing on the construction of a traditional early 20th century dinghy at the Tall Ship. Gemma also talked about the Continuing Professional Development events she organises at GCHT.

Read the transcript.

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

The City Talks: Glasgow has an ever-changing skyline, is this a sign of a vibrant city?

Glasgow has an ever-changing skyline, is this a sign of a vibrant city?
Glasgow is a city which never sleeps! A cultural and economic hub with an ever-changing skyline; but is this constant evolution the sign of an exciting city, or is Glasgow losing the unique historic built environment at the heart of its soul? Our panel of speakers discussed the pros and cons of becoming a modern metropolis, and the challenges faced when incorporating the old with the new.

About The City Talks: Glasgow City Heritage Trust hold a series of quarterly events called ‘The City Talks’. As opposed to the more traditional format of our lecture series, The City Talks are two-way debates between a specially selected panel of experts and the audience. This debate was held on 2nd November 2016 at Cottiers Theatre in the West End.

Panellists:

  • Niall Murphy, Glasgow City Heritage Trust
  • Jude Barber, Collective Architecture
  • Ranald McInnes, Historic Environment Scotland
  • Karen Pickering, Page \ Park Architects
  • Chris Coleman-Smith, Hoskins Architects

In memory of Gareth Hoskins, 1967-2016

Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Dr George Rawson

Dr George Rawson discusses the Glasgow School of Art in the early 20th Century. Alf Webster attended Glasgow School of Art between 1903 and 1907 as an evening student and the talk examines Webster’s student career against the background of the school’s educational regime during the period 1899-1915 when it was one of the leading schools in Europe.

Dr George Rawson, fine art and design librarian at the Glasgow School of Art 1977-2006, is an art historian with a special interest in 19th century British art education the Glasgow Style and the Arts and Crafts Movement.

Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Professor Robin Webster OBE

Professor Robin Webster OBE is a partner in the Glasgow firm of Cameron Webster Architects, and professor emeritus at the Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, where he was head of the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture for twenty years. He is Secretary of the Walmer Crescent Association, Chairman of The Alexander Thomson Society and a trustee of the Scottish Stained Glass Symposium. Robin is currently the Development Consultant for Glasgow City Heritage Trust. Robin is the son of Gordon Webster and grandson of Alf Webster.

Robin will discuss Alf Webster from a family perspective, and describe from his personal experience; what it was like living with a stained glass artist, and what he learned and remembers from growing up with a stained glass studio in his childhood home with his father Gordon Webster. He will also talk briefly about the different qualities that he sees in the windows of his father and grandfather, and their contribution to the art of stained glass in Scotland.

Glamour & Grit: Glasgow in the 1860s and the beginning of ‘a better condition of things in Scotland as regards stained glass’, Dr Sally Rush

Glasgow in the 1860s and the beginning of 'a better condition of things in Scotland as regards stained glass'

Dr. Sally Rush is a senior lecturer in History of Art at the University of Glasgow, specialising in historic interiors and the visual culture of the Renaissance court. Her study of Scottish glass painting began when she was asked to contribute to the Glasgow volume of the Buildings of Scotland and she completed her Ph.D, Glass Painting in Scotland, 1830-1870 in 2001. In 2003, her doctoral research was put to one side in order to work with Historic Scotland on the restoration of Stirling Castle Palace. Recently, however, she has been working on the stained glass at Durham Cathedral and has contributed to Durham Cathedral: history, fabric and culture (2014). She is married to the stained-glass conservator and artist Mark Bambrough.

Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Discussion

Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Peter Aiers

Peter will talk about the wider use of historic churches for an increasingly secular community. He will discuss how to blend a sustainable future use whilst still understanding the historic nature of the building and respecting the former spiritual use. It is important that future generations are able to see the history of their communities embedded in the fabric of the building. No building tells the story of a place like the parish church does.

Peter Aiers joined the Churches Conservation Trust in 2007 and set up the Regeneration Taskforce to find solutions to complex historic church problems and enable more community involvement in the care and maintenance of our wonderful portfolio. He became Director for the South East in 2012 with a specific responsibility for overall Operational Management. Peter has raised well over £12m since being with the CCT and has led on several innovative projects such as the award winning All Souls Bolton, Champing and St Peter and the Old Black Lion.

Alf Webster: G(l)azing into the world of Stained Glass Conservation, Meredith Macbeth

G(l)azing into the world of Stained Glass Conservation, will give an introduction to the method and techniques behind the conservation and restoration of 19 & 20th century stained glass. A review of the present stained glass conservation field will be discussed, as will future hopes be considered in order for Scotland to preserve its own unique stained glass heritage.

Meredith Macbeth is a self employed stained/leaded glass maker and conservator based outside of Edinburgh. Her Master’s degree from the University of Lincoln studied the Conservation of Historic Objects and after working for several years in stone and architectural
conservation, she was drawn to the world of stained glass where conservation and craft are so closely entwined. Meredith has worked in several stained glass studios in the United States along with completing an internship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Meredith currently works with the Scottish Stained Glass Symposium and Trust, which is undertaking the mammoth task of recording all Scottish stained glass and developing their online database.