The City Talks: Glasgow has an ever-changing skyline, is this a sign of a vibrant city?

Glasgow has an ever-changing skyline, is this a sign of a vibrant city?
Glasgow is a city which never sleeps! A cultural and economic hub with an ever-changing skyline; but is this constant evolution the sign of an exciting city, or is Glasgow losing the unique historic built environment at the heart of its soul? Our panel of speakers discussed the pros and cons of becoming a modern metropolis, and the challenges faced when incorporating the old with the new.

About The City Talks: Glasgow City Heritage Trust hold a series of quarterly events called ‘The City Talks’. As opposed to the more traditional format of our lecture series, The City Talks are two-way debates between a specially selected panel of experts and the audience. This debate was held on 2nd November 2016 at Cottiers Theatre in the West End.

Panellists:

  • Niall Murphy, Glasgow City Heritage Trust
  • Jude Barber, Collective Architecture
  • Ranald McInnes, Historic Environment Scotland
  • Karen Pickering, Page \ Park Architects
  • Chris Coleman-Smith, Hoskins Architects

In memory of Gareth Hoskins, 1967-2016

End of the Line: Explore Glasgow’s Industrial Past

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

John R Hume first started documenting Glasgow’s industrial buildings in 1964. Wandering the city by bicycle, he was determined to get images of as many of the city’s decaying industrial buildings as possible before they disappeared. He was just in time.

END OF THE LINE EXHIBITION, SUMMER 2019

In the summer of 2019, GCHT created the exhibition End of the Line: Photographs of Glasgow’s Industrial Past by Professor John R Hume. People came to see the exhibition for a variety of reasons, including personal memories of the buildings photographed, an interest in industrial heritage or photography, and curiosity about the former Tax Hall as many people had never seen inside the building. Running from 25th July until 5th September, the exhibition had over 1,200 visitors in just six weeks.

This is the first time that these images, many of which were originally included in John R Hume’s book Industrial Archaeology of Glasgow (Blackie, 1974), had been exhibited together on a large scale. The powerful black and white photographs demonstrate the monumentality and ambition of Glasgow’s industrial buildings, as well as the diversity of architectural styles; they span neo-gothic, neoclassical, and Venetian to name a few. The viewer is encouraged to admire the intricate architectural details of each building and to imagine the lives of the people who may have worked there.

AUDIO TOUR & INTERACTIVE MAP

An audio tour of selected highlights of the exhibition by John R Hume is available online.

End of the Line Building Locations

GLASGOW’S INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE CAPTURED

The dramatic changes in Glasgow’s urban fabric since the 1960s were in large part a consequence of the decline of industry after the Second World War. Postwar government policies, such as clearances for Comprehensive Development Areas and the creation of the M8 urban motorway, virtually flattened areas of the city including the Gorbals, Hutchesontown, Anderston and Bridgeton. The photographs in End of the Line represent the enormity of the loss of Glasgow’s industrial heritage: every building depicted has subsequently been demolished. 

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City Portals: A Heritage Project for Schools

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The Tenement Renaissance City – the New Gorbals and Laurieston

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Walking Tour 3

The Gilded City – the Victorian and Edwardian city Our walking tours are taken by GCHT Building Grants Officer, Niall Murphy who is a walking encyclopaedia of knowledge! From the 1830s onwards, as the population rose and the rapidly industrialising city boomed, Glasgow was transformed. This age gave rise to some of the city’s finest […]

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Exhibition: 10 Years / 10 Buildings

 Established in 2007, Glasgow City Heritage Trust champions the city’s unique architecture and built environment and promotes and encourages the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors, now and in the future.

Every year we help to fund important conservation projects across Glasgow, and encourage people to gain a better understanding of our historic buildings and places.

2017 marked the tenth anniversary of the Trust and a suitable point to look back on what we have achieved over the last decade. To celebrate we invited you to explore our archives and discover just a few of the fantastic conservation projects the Trust supports.

While our city of glamour and grit may give the impression of solidity and permanence, it does require great care and careful conservation if it is to be passed on to future generations. The volume of requests for grant funding we continue to receive every year shows how much there is still to do across Glasgow to conserve, enhance and promote the unique built heritage of our city.

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity supported by Glasgow City Council and Historic Environment Scotland.

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

EXHIBITION: Lost Glasgow – More than Just Memories

Since launching in 2014, the Lost Glasgow Facebook page has attracted a 135k-strong global following. The site, which uses archive photographs to spark stories, memories, and debate about the city,  its buildings, its people, and its ever-evolving history and future, was launched off the back of the successful Lost Edinburgh site.

In the summer of 2017 Glasgow City Heritage Trust teamed up with Lost Glasgow, to present an exhibition devoted to the documentation, discussion and appreciation of Glasgow’s changing architecture and its community throughout the last few centuries.

The exhibition covers everything from the majestic to the mundane, from the city’s great buildings to its more humble corners, from the tenement to the townhouse, from the great and the good, to the ‘common old workin’ man (and woman). The bottom line is, we love Glasgow, and the tales of our city. And everybody in Glasgow loves to hear a good story.

Folk were invited to join in, be a curator and rearrange our exhibition, then leave us a comment about the pictures they connected with the most.

A day in the life of the exhibition!

This exhibition is currently not on show. It is being transformed into two handling boxes with artefacts and activities for all ages.

More information is coming soon! 

We would like to thank The Glasgow Herald/Evening Times, The Daily Record, The Scotsman, and Lost Glasgow’s many site fans for opening their picture archives to us. Without their kind co-operation, these images – and memories – would have remained lost and buried…

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Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Dr George Rawson

Dr George Rawson discusses the Glasgow School of Art in the early 20th Century. Alf Webster attended Glasgow School of Art between 1903 and 1907 as an evening student and the talk examines Webster’s student career against the background of the school’s educational regime during the period 1899-1915 when it was one of the leading schools in Europe.

Dr George Rawson, fine art and design librarian at the Glasgow School of Art 1977-2006, is an art historian with a special interest in 19th century British art education the Glasgow Style and the Arts and Crafts Movement.

Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Professor Robin Webster OBE

Professor Robin Webster OBE is a partner in the Glasgow firm of Cameron Webster Architects, and professor emeritus at the Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, where he was head of the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture for twenty years. He is Secretary of the Walmer Crescent Association, Chairman of The Alexander Thomson Society and a trustee of the Scottish Stained Glass Symposium. Robin is currently the Development Consultant for Glasgow City Heritage Trust. Robin is the son of Gordon Webster and grandson of Alf Webster.

Robin will discuss Alf Webster from a family perspective, and describe from his personal experience; what it was like living with a stained glass artist, and what he learned and remembers from growing up with a stained glass studio in his childhood home with his father Gordon Webster. He will also talk briefly about the different qualities that he sees in the windows of his father and grandfather, and their contribution to the art of stained glass in Scotland.

Glamour & Grit: Glasgow in the 1860s and the beginning of ‘a better condition of things in Scotland as regards stained glass’, Dr Sally Rush

Glasgow in the 1860s and the beginning of 'a better condition of things in Scotland as regards stained glass'

Dr. Sally Rush is a senior lecturer in History of Art at the University of Glasgow, specialising in historic interiors and the visual culture of the Renaissance court. Her study of Scottish glass painting began when she was asked to contribute to the Glasgow volume of the Buildings of Scotland and she completed her Ph.D, Glass Painting in Scotland, 1830-1870 in 2001. In 2003, her doctoral research was put to one side in order to work with Historic Scotland on the restoration of Stirling Castle Palace. Recently, however, she has been working on the stained glass at Durham Cathedral and has contributed to Durham Cathedral: history, fabric and culture (2014). She is married to the stained-glass conservator and artist Mark Bambrough.

Glasgow’s Gilded Age Project, 2015

Gilded_Age_Logo

The Glasgow’s Gilded Age Project highlights those Glasgow designers who originally established the city’s reputation at the time of the Aesthetic Movement and Mark Twain’s so called Gilded Age. Glasgow’s international reputation for design and manufacture sprang forth from the city’s industries, as well as its educational institutions, and its influence spread across the globe through trade.  This laid the foundation for Glasgow’s inimitable ‘style’.

This project aims to create long-term beneficial partnerships within educational and heritage institutions who will encourage crucial research related to topics like those discussed today. We already have the support of our speakers; from the Glasgow School of Art, the National Trust of Scotland, and even from further afield, the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. We want to promote Glasgow as a centre for cultural tourism, highlighting what the city already has to offer visitors and locals alike. We aim to re-evaluate Glasgow’s design history, and elevate the status of the movers and shakers who helped to propel Glasgow to the its place as the second city of the empire.

GLASGOW'S GILDED AGE 1864-1914: GLAMOUR & GRIT

The Glasgow’s Gilded Age (1864 -1914): Glamour & Grit conference was held on the 8th May 2015 at Cottiers Theatre in Glasgow’s West End. The conference was an exciting introduction to the period, the academics who study it, and the legacy it has left behind. The conference was far more than a one day event; it signified the beginning of what we hope will be a new movement celebrating this period of Glasgow’s history, and promoting Glasgow’s industrial and artistic heritage, for without one there could not be the other, the glamour and the grit.

Between 1864 and 1914 Glasgow was a thriving centre for design and innovation in industries as varied as textile manufacture and shipbuilding. The techniques and skills learnt by the workers and designers in these industries directly affected the art produced in the city. The individuals who gained financially from this boom, the shipping magnates and ironworks owners, were able to spend lavishly on buildings, art, and furnishing their homes, advertising not only their personal wealth and style, but also Glasgow’s. This led to Glasgow becoming a producer and educator of all things aesthetically pleasing and functional.

Alf. A. Webster: Glasgow's Lost Genius

On the 6th November 2015, we celebrated the Centenary of Alfred Alexander Webster (1883-1915), stained glass artist and master-craftsman, through a one day conference at Webster’s Theatre in Glasgow’s West End.

In 1903, Alf registered for evening classes at the Glasgow School of Art and took a variety of courses including architectural modelling and stained glass, later switching to drawing and painting. It was the study of glass painting and the creation of stained glass windows which would eventually hold his attention.  The skills he learned from life drawing classes would transfer into his windows, Webster is well-known for his ability to create incredibly detailed and emotive human faces.

Webster’s career was drastically cut short by the outbreak of the Great War in 1914. Webster sustained serious injuries on patrol duty on the night of the 16th August 1915. Despite ten operations he died of his wounds on the 24th August 1915.

The conference celebrated Alf’s tragically short life, and incredible artistic output, to give him the recognition he deserves as an important Glasgow artist and craftsman.

  • All
  • Alf Webster
  • Glamour & Grit
Glamour & Grit: The Grammar of Glamour: Glasgow Style, Dr Robyne Erica Calvert
Glamour & Grit: Holmwood House, Ian Gow
Glamour & Grit: Glasgow in the 1860s and the beginning of ‘a better condition of things in Scotland as regards stained glass’, Dr Sally Rush
Glamour & Grit: Gilding the lily – Daniel Cottier and the Aesthetic Interior, Max Donnelly
Glamour & Grit: Carpets of Distinction, Dr Helena Britt
Glamour & Grit: A Solid Background, Professor John Hume
Glamour & Grit : The Glasgow Architectural Ironfounders – Innovation & Global Reach, Dr David Mitchell
Alf Webster: It’s All About Alf, Karen Mailley-Watt
Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Professor Robin Webster OBE
Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Prof John Hume
Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Peter Aiers
Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Gordon Urquhart
Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Dr George Rawson
Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Discussion
Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, David Robertson
Alf Webster: G(l)azing into the world of Stained Glass Conservation, Meredith Macbeth

Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Discussion

Alf Webster: Glasgow’s Lost Genius, Peter Aiers

Peter will talk about the wider use of historic churches for an increasingly secular community. He will discuss how to blend a sustainable future use whilst still understanding the historic nature of the building and respecting the former spiritual use. It is important that future generations are able to see the history of their communities embedded in the fabric of the building. No building tells the story of a place like the parish church does.

Peter Aiers joined the Churches Conservation Trust in 2007 and set up the Regeneration Taskforce to find solutions to complex historic church problems and enable more community involvement in the care and maintenance of our wonderful portfolio. He became Director for the South East in 2012 with a specific responsibility for overall Operational Management. Peter has raised well over £12m since being with the CCT and has led on several innovative projects such as the award winning All Souls Bolton, Champing and St Peter and the Old Black Lion.