ONLINE EXHIBITION LAUNCH: TnmntTilesIRL

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider adding a donation when you book your ticket
simply select the ‘Standard + Donation’ option to donate £5
.

Monday 5th October 2020 | 6pm BST | via Zoom

Join us for the online launch of the TnmntTilesIRL exhibition. Zan Phee, the curator of this archive of historical tenement tiles, will be with us to chat about her project and answer your questions.

For over five years Zan has wandered all the corners of Glasgow and further afield with the aim of capturing images that show the beauty of tenement life for her online archive. Showcasing the amazing artistry of the tiled walls, to the imposing spiral staircases, to the painted glass murals found on doors and windows, the impressive archive has gained an army of loyal followers on Twitter and Instagram.

Glasgow City Heritage Trust was delighted to offer a Community Grant to support an ‘In Real Life’ exhibition of the TnmntTiles archive. Sadly, the Covid-19 pandemic has put a stop to our physical exhibitions for the time being, and so Zan has worked hard to reinvent the project as a virtual exhibition instead.

Free, booking required, donations welcome. 

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Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

EXHIBITION: TnmntTiles IRL

For over five years Zan Phee has wandered all the corners of Glasgow, and further afield, with the aim of capturing images that show the beauty of tenement life for her online archive; from the amazing artistry found on its tiled walls, to the imposing spiral staircases, leading past striking painted glass murals, that still adorn many of its windows and doors. Her online following on Twitter and Instagram enjoy the wholesomeness of the resulting social media archive, allowing people of all genders, political and religious alignments, to come together and appreciate the workmanship archived by Zan and the many other contributors to the project.

Glasgow City Heritage Trust was delighted to offer a Heritage Grant to support an ‘in real life’ exhibition of the Tenement Tiles archive. Sadly, the COVID pandemic has put a stop to our physical exhibitions for the time being, and so Zan has worked hard to reinvent the project as a virtual exhibition, which we are pleased to present here.

Click through to the online exhibition page, where you will find the 32 images selected for the exhibition, accompanied by quotes, kindly contributed by some of the TnmntTiles social media followers. The images and text display the various conditions found within these shared spaces, and how their occupants feel about tenement life in 2020.

An accompanying digital booklet can also be viewed.

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Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Exhibition : Glasgow’s Coat of Arms: Getting on the Map

Exhibition runs 13th December 2019-6th February 2020 

54 Bell Street, 10am-5pm

Free entry 

The miracles of St Mungo provide the symbols of the tree, the bird, the bell and the fish; the core elements of the city’s coat of arms. Since St Mungo’s time, the history and development of the Coat of Arms mirrors that of Glasgow itself. 

Getting on the Map allows anyone the chance to have their own take on the tree, the bird, the fish and the bell. Originating in the Twitter account @GlasgowCoA, contributors share their images of the coat of arms from around the city and beyond. This collaborative exhibition showcases these images. 

It’s an inclusive approach to archiving the much-loved symbol: contributors, even when bringing a familiar rendition of the coat of arms from a familiar building, always have their own take on it. In an age when most of us have a phone camera in our pocket, there can be as many takes on the coat of arms as there are Glaswegians! 

Get on the map, see what’s there, and be on the map with your own discoveries and images.

End of the Line: Explore Glasgow’s Industrial Past

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

John R Hume first started documenting Glasgow’s industrial buildings in 1964. Wandering the city by bicycle, he was determined to get images of as many of the city’s decaying industrial buildings as possible before they disappeared. He was just in time.

END OF THE LINE EXHIBITION, SUMMER 2019

In the summer of 2019, GCHT created the exhibition End of the Line: Photographs of Glasgow’s Industrial Past by Professor John R Hume. People came to see the exhibition for a variety of reasons, including personal memories of the buildings photographed, an interest in industrial heritage or photography, and curiosity about the former Tax Hall as many people had never seen inside the building. Running from 25th July until 5th September, the exhibition had over 1,200 visitors in just six weeks.

This is the first time that these images, many of which were originally included in John R Hume’s book Industrial Archaeology of Glasgow (Blackie, 1974), had been exhibited together on a large scale. The powerful black and white photographs demonstrate the monumentality and ambition of Glasgow’s industrial buildings, as well as the diversity of architectural styles; they span neo-gothic, neoclassical, and Venetian to name a few. The viewer is encouraged to admire the intricate architectural details of each building and to imagine the lives of the people who may have worked there.

AUDIO TOUR & INTERACTIVE MAP

An audio tour of selected highlights of the exhibition by John R Hume is available online.

End of the Line Building Locations

GLASGOW’S INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE CAPTURED

The dramatic changes in Glasgow’s urban fabric since the 1960s were in large part a consequence of the decline of industry after the Second World War. Postwar government policies, such as clearances for Comprehensive Development Areas and the creation of the M8 urban motorway, virtually flattened areas of the city including the Gorbals, Hutchesontown, Anderston and Bridgeton. The photographs in End of the Line represent the enormity of the loss of Glasgow’s industrial heritage: every building depicted has subsequently been demolished. 

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City Portals: A Heritage Project for Schools

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Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

EXHIBITION: GLASGOW LANDMARKS

Robin Webster & Will Knight

Date: 6th March – 31st May 

Venue: Glasgow City Heritage Trust, 54 Bell St, Glasgow

Friends & Family View: April 26th 6-8pm, no RSVP required 

Exhibition open to all 10am-5pm Monday to Friday

For Glasgow Landmarks artists Robin Webster and Will Knight will present a series of paintings, drawings and prints at Glasgow City Heritage Trust. The buildings that the artists have chosen to record are not ‘landmarks’ in the traditional sense – the canonical buildings people would normally associate with Glasgow – such as The Glasgow School of Art, University of Glasgow, or the SEC ‘Armadillo’. Rather, they are Glasgow’s ‘other’ landmarks best known by locals, such as the tunnel rotundas, Jaconelli’s café and the Barras Market.

There is a sense of ‘otherness’ in the landmarks that the artists depict, both looking beyond the city’s usual landmarks both in their choice of buildings and the way that these places have been recorded – through other, more organic mediums using pen and watercolour or screen printing, which go beyond traditional methods of critiquing or recording buildings, such CAD drawings, scale models and photographs traditionally used by architects. Contemplating Robin Webster’s watercolour drawings, screen prints, and collages and Will Knight’s scale watercolour drawings we can appreciate these ‘other’ methods of recording architecture which are no less valuable in terms of what we learn about the subjects.

The exhibition is an exploration of the notions of tradition and the canonical works of architecture to help expand our understanding of what is a landmark and what is valuable in terms of our collective heritage. The artists’ subjective approach to the recording of buildings in this exhibition opens up discussions on the nature of experiencing architecture and of ‘landmarks’ themselves – which is contingent on the individual’s own subjective experience and familiarity with the urban landscape.

 

The exhibition will be open from 6th March – 26 April 2019

Glasgow City Heritage Trust
 54 Bell Street
Glasgow
G1 1LQ

Professor Robin Webster OBE PRIAS RSA RIBA FRSA

Robin is an architect, but also the son of Gordon Webster and the grandson of Alf Webster, two very distinguished Glasgow stained glass artists, and the was brought up in a house that was also his father’s studio and workshop, so an enthusiasm for art has rubbed off. He is a partner in the firm of the award winning CameronWebster architects in the city, along with his daughter and son-in law. He has drawn and painted all his life, mostly for his own pleasure, but also exhibiting at the Royal Scottish Academy, The Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland, and at various other galleries throughout the country.

He was born in Glasgow but spent more than twenty years in London practicing with Robin Spence in the architectural firm of Spence + Webster, winning a number of architectural competitions and building his own steel framed courtyard house there. He has also taught widely, and took the chair of Architecture at the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture in the Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, where he was Head of School for twenty years, returning to Glasgow in 2005.

Alasdair Gray remarked in his Novel “Lanark” that Glasgow suffered from not enough being written about it, or pictures painted of it. This exhibition is a small attempt to remedy this, and focuses on buildings in Glasgow, including some that were “at risk” but have been repaired with the help of the Glasgow City Heritage Trust, where Robin has been a consultant and was also one of the founding Trustees. He is currently the Treasurer of the Royal Scottish Academy, and in 2018 he was elected President of the Royal Incorporation of Architects.

Will Knight

Glasgow based artist Will Knight trained at the Mackintosh School of Architecture, which stimulated his interest in the significance of people and place, and the role that the environment plays in both reflecting and shaping community and cultural identity.

Will has developed his investigations of domestic, commercial and industrial buildings through recording, measurement and drawing by hand, ever since his Masters Research on Glasgow Tenement Bakeries. The architect Sarah Wigglesworth has informed this technique, as Wigglesworth says, ‘To capture something as large as a building on the size of a piece of paper, architects work to a reduced scale, using symbols and codes to represent the world’.

Unlike the survey drawings of an archaeologist, generated to provide an accurate record of a site as left by its inhabitants, Will’s drawings are produced in dialogue with the people who shape these places as their own. Will produces drawings that accurately show the nature of a space, or place, and the forensic details record its character; encouraging the viewer to engage in, and explore, thesubject matter as a new way to consider the spaces and places we inhabit. His drawings act as a lens and provide a framework for debate, a catalyst for a wider discussion as opposed to an end in itself.

Will has previously exhibited work on Independent Newsagents at the New Glasgow Society, and a series of Section Drawings Through Gibson Street at the Woodlands Workspace. Last Summer he won the Summerhall Award at the RSA Open Exhibition, and is working on a series of drawings for an exhibition at Summerhall in Edinburgh this Autumn.

The drawings here are a selection of works that attempt to record and recognise the breadth of scale, scope and style of the city’s built heritage from Victorian Villas to art deco cafes.

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Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Exhibition: Women, War and The West End

Women, War & the West End will tell the stories of ordinary women and what they did during the First World War. The Heritage Lottery Funded project, run in partnership with Four Acres Charitable Trust, Friends of Glasgow West and The Scottish Graduate School of Arts & Humanities, will focus on women who had an impact on Glasgow’s West End during & after WWI. The exhibition will also explore an under-researched aspect of life – the work of women and war memorials.

 

This exhibition will be open from Monday 10th December 2018 until 28th February 2019 at

Glasgow City Heritage Trust

 54 Bell Street
Glasgow
G1 1LQ

Monday – Friday
10am – 4pm

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Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Exhibition: 10 Years / 10 Buildings

 Established in 2007, Glasgow City Heritage Trust champions the city’s unique architecture and built environment and promotes and encourages the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors, now and in the future.

Every year we help to fund important conservation projects across Glasgow, and encourage people to gain a better understanding of our historic buildings and places.

2017 marked the tenth anniversary of the Trust and a suitable point to look back on what we have achieved over the last decade. To celebrate we invited you to explore our archives and discover just a few of the fantastic conservation projects the Trust supports.

While our city of glamour and grit may give the impression of solidity and permanence, it does require great care and careful conservation if it is to be passed on to future generations. The volume of requests for grant funding we continue to receive every year shows how much there is still to do across Glasgow to conserve, enhance and promote the unique built heritage of our city.

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity supported by Glasgow City Council and Historic Environment Scotland.

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

EXHIBITION: Lost Glasgow – More than Just Memories

Since launching in 2014, the Lost Glasgow Facebook page has attracted a 135k-strong global following. The site, which uses archive photographs to spark stories, memories, and debate about the city,  its buildings, its people, and its ever-evolving history and future, was launched off the back of the successful Lost Edinburgh site.

In the summer of 2017 Glasgow City Heritage Trust teamed up with Lost Glasgow, to present an exhibition devoted to the documentation, discussion and appreciation of Glasgow’s changing architecture and its community throughout the last few centuries.

The exhibition covers everything from the majestic to the mundane, from the city’s great buildings to its more humble corners, from the tenement to the townhouse, from the great and the good, to the ‘common old workin’ man (and woman). The bottom line is, we love Glasgow, and the tales of our city. And everybody in Glasgow loves to hear a good story.

Folk were invited to join in, be a curator and rearrange our exhibition, then leave us a comment about the pictures they connected with the most.

A day in the life of the exhibition!

This exhibition is currently not on show. It is being transformed into two handling boxes with artefacts and activities for all ages.

More information is coming soon! 

We would like to thank The Glasgow Herald/Evening Times, The Daily Record, The Scotsman, and Lost Glasgow’s many site fans for opening their picture archives to us. Without their kind co-operation, these images – and memories – would have remained lost and buried…

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Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

So…we’re allowed out every day for a walk, we have kids at home to entertain and the streets are deserted – sounds like an ideal time to have a go at some heritage detective work!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Exhibition: Glasgow’s Red Giants + Other Images

An exhibition and charitable sale of original artwork and prints by our very own Professor Robin Webster OBE RSA FRIAS.

Alasdair Gray once remarked that one of the problems with Glasgow is that there are not enough drawings or paintings that celebrate it. So here is an attempt to remedy this in a small way.

I am motivated by the quality of the city’s architecture, and its large number of listed buildings “at risk” makes me want to encourage more people to appreciate and value it. The work focuses mainly on the large red sandstone buildings in the city centre, built when Glasgow was the wealthy second city of the British Empire, although there are also other images of different buildings in the city.

– Robin Webster

There are two parts to the works on show: the first is a series of limited edition digital prints in which Robin has manipulated photographs in order to single out and draw to people’s attention the size and impact of the architecture, in the hope that they will look again. These prints retain some of the buildings’ sharpness and details, while emphasising their impact, weight and solidity.

In the second part Robin has explored the flamboyant richness of the city’s built fabric in a freehand and more painterly fashion in a series of original watercolours, encouraging us to appreciate the many qualities of our great city.

Robin is an architect who was born in Glasgow, the twin son of Gordon Webster and grandson of Alf Webster, both well known stained glass artists. He was educated at the University of Cambridge and the Bartlett at UCL. He worked for Gillespie Kidd and Coia architects in Glasgow for a brief period in 1961-62, and ran his own practice in London and Aberdeen until 2005, when he became a partner of cameronwebster architects in Glasgow along with his daughter and son in law. He has taught at Cambridge, the Bartlett, The Mackintosh School of Architecture GSA, Washington University St Louis, and was Professor of Architecture and Head of School at The Scott Sutherland School in the Robert Gordon University Aberdeen from 1984 until 2004. He has drawn and painted all his life.

This exhibition has now ended. Digital Prints and Framed Watercolours from the exhibition are available to purchase in our online shop.

Glasgow Shops: The Development of a Retail Empire

Introduction: The roots of Glasgow’s retail heritage lie in the many market stalls and traders’ carts which lined the High Street in the city’s medieval heyday. Later, these temporary stalls developed into fixed stands or early ‘shops’ which specialised in only one product, such as cobblers, blacksmiths or butchers.

It was only during the Victorian period that ‘shopping’ as a concept emerged – changing something which had been a daily chore into a pleasurable pastime. Technological advancements meant that all kinds of products could now be manufactured quickly and cheaply, allowing people to buy items they couldn’t previously afford – such as elaborate clothing, furniture and imported foods.

To cater to this rapidly growing consumer market, a new type of shop began to develop – the department store. Wylie & Lochhead, Paisleys, Pettigrew & Stephens and Anderson’s Royal Polytechnic were just some of the many department stores in the city centre, providing a variety of products under one roof. At present, only two famous department stores from the past – Frasers and Watt Brothers – survive in their original form, while others have dramatically changed over the past two centuries.

Nowadays, new buildings are deliberately designed to stand out from the rest of the street and make an impact, which makes it all the more difficult for independent businesses on the ground floors of tenement flats to continue to compete, and survive. Yet these buildings once served as the very foundation stones of the Glasgow we recognise today, and are crucial for the continuing success of the city as the largest shopping destination outside of London. With the rise of outer-city retail parks and enormous supermarket brands, it is clear that we need to preserve and protect our shops now more than ever, lest our high streets become little more than an abandoned reminder of a forgotten age.

 

Historic Department Stores: The concept of ‘shopping’ as we now know it did not exist before the nineteenth century. Goods were sold at markets and fairs, by street traders or by shops specialising in one type of product only, such as cobblers, blacksmiths or butchers.

During the Victorian period, however, a new type of shop began to emerge – the department store. Shopping was transformed from a daily chore to a pleasurable past time, with different departments and products all under one roof.

Advancements in technology meant that all kinds of products could now be mass manufactured quickly and cheaply, and a new ‘ready to buy’ culture emerged. This appealed in particular to the rising middle classes, who were enjoying the spoils of their newfound wealth as a result of the Industrial Revolution. It was common for wives of successful businessmen to demonstrate their status through their fashionable dress, and so women became department stores’ biggest customers.

Wylie & Lochhead, Paisleys, Pettigrew & Stephens, Copland & Lye and Anderson’s Royal Polytechnic were just some of the many department stores that lined Sauchiehall Street, Buchanan Street, Argyle Street and Jamaica Street. Today, only two famous department stores from the past – Frasers and Watt Brothers – survive in their original form to give a sense of what shoppers in the nineteenth century might have experienced.

 

The Load-bearing Façade: Many Glasgow shops feature non-structural façades, which enable the external appearance of the shop to be easily modified. As commerce is driven by demand and competition, it is crucial that shops are able to adapt both their business and their image in order to keep up with a changing consumer landscape.

In some cases, the building’s façade dictates the appearance of the ground-floor unit, making it less flexible to change, but adding a sense of quality, unity and permanence to the urban composition. Sadly, these traditional street fronts are often spoiled by surrounding street ‘clutter’, such as modern railings and signage, which breaks up the street’s otherwise harmonious aesthetic.

 

The Authentic Public House: As a fundamental part of British life, it is essential that the familiar image of the public house does not vanish from our high streets. Although it is important for traditional pubs to maintain a sense of historical authenticity, there is also a need for some aspects to be modernised, in order to continue to attract new customers. Large windows are a relatively new feature used to make pubs seem more inviting to passers-by, whilst the reflective properties of the glass provide a comfortable level of privacy.

Nowadays, commercial pressures regularly necessitate the use of branded advertisements outside, but pubs wishing to preserve their historical heritage present their products in a way that is much more sympathetic to the local surroundings, such as The Lismore, pictured right second. Here, the timber panelling is reminiscent of an oak whisky barrel in profile, and a glimpse of the stained glass panels invites the prospective customer to experience them from the inside.

 

Modern Interventions: Not all modern shop fronts reject the traditional Victorian design in favour of low cost materials and quick results. Both Molton Brown (right second) and Waterstone’s on Argyle Street (right third) have maintained the wooden framework and classic proportions of the original layout, but clean lines and block colours reinterpret the design for the modern age.

Other shop fronts maintain a sense of historical continuity in line with modern sensibilities through other means – for example, the bold design and futuristic plate glass of the All Saints store on Buchanan Street (right bottom) is tempered by the vast rows of nineteenth century Singer sewing machines. In its heyday, the Singer factory in Glasgow was the largest in the world, producing over 37 million sewing machines from 1884 – 1943.

The recently restored shop fronts such as those pictured above and on the right top, are excellent examples of successful, varied, independent businesses. Sadly, not all independent shops are thriving, as demonstrated by an abundance of ‘To Let’ and ‘For Sale’ signs which dominate some areas in Glasgow, such as the former Murray’s butcher’s, pictured right third.

The close proximity of large supermarkets mean that many smaller shops can no longer afford to compete for customers. The all-too common sight of an abandoned shopping trolley in front of a disused premises on the Gallowgate, pictured right bottom, is a sad reminder of this fact.

 

Sympathetic Shop Fronts: Many of Glasgow’s shops are located on the ground floor of tenement flats, which were originally built as a mixture of commercial space and housing. Modern shops that are considerate of their historical surroundings try to adapt their signage to fit in with the rest of the street, such as Cafe Toscana on Argyle Street or Cottonrake Home Bakery on Hyndland Street (right second and right third).

To protect their businesses, modern shop owners often use anonymous roller shutters, which can spoil a street’s aesthetic. With the help of grants from schemes such as the Townscape Heritage Initiatives, some businesses have reinstated the historic window bars which combine security with attractiveness. Others make use of internal safety shutters which are far less obtrusive than their external counterparts.