Designer Brief: The Knight Map Exhibition

GCHT is inviting tenders for the design of our upcoming exhibition, which will showcase Glasgow’s historic built environment through the artist Will Knight’s recently completed map of the city.

Click here for the full design brief

Deadline: 10th March, 2023 at 9:00am

Enquiries and submissions should be made by email to: info@glasgowheritage.org.uk

Offline Sulman Map Sales

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**Cancelled** Doors Open Days Online Talk: The Glasgow City Improvement Trust and the Transformation of the Victorian City

photograph of Bell-of-the-Brae-southern-tenement

Unfortunately due to some unforeseen circumstances we’ve had to cancel this talk. If you booked a ticket, please check your inbox for more details, and we apologise for any inconvenience this might cause. We hope to see you at another event soon! 

 

Thursday, 15th September | 6pm | via Zoom

GCHT’s Deputy Director Niall Murphy will be giving an online talk on the achievements of the Glasgow City Improvement Trust as part of Doors Open Days 2022.

Over the course of the 19th Century, Glasgow suffered explosive city growth, with its population increasing from 77,000 in 1801 to 762,000 by 1901. This rapid growth created problems of overcrowding, poor sanitation and population health issues, with the city’s housing conditions regarded as amongst the worst in Europe.

To combat this, in 1866 Lord Provost Blackie led a delegation including Glasgow’s Medical Officer of Health, Dr William Tennant Gairdner, and the City Architect, John Carrick to Europe to see what lessons could be learned. Having visited Amsterdam and Brussels it was Baron Haussmann’s Paris where they were most impressed by the urban innovations being introduced for Napoleon III.

Upon his return to Glasgow, Carrick drew up the City Improvement Act of 1866 with a programme of slum clearance to clear out and introduce light and air to the medieval heart of the city. This made Glasgow a pioneering city for municipal improvements with the English social reformer, Octavia Hill, leading a parliamentary delegation to find out what the city was up to.

Join us to find out more about the revolutionary work of the City Improvement Trust and its legacy for Glasgow!

Free, booking required, donations welcome. 

We are using Zoom to broadcast our live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

All events are subtitled. We aim to make our events as accessible as possible but if you feel that you might need some additional help, please let us know when you book your ticket or get in touch in advance. We’re open to feedback and would welcome your ideas on how we can improve in this area.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

All events are recorded and everyone who has booked will be sent a link to the recording to watch again after the event. We are a small team and this can take a couple of weeks so please bear with us!

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Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

What Next for Glasgow’s City Centre? In-Person Panel Discussion

Photograph of Glasgow skyline at sunset

Wednesday, 28th September  | 7:00pm | The Merchants House, 7 West George Street, G2 1BA

Join GCHT for an in-person panel discussion that asks the question, “What Next for Glasgow’s City Centre?” 

Our panelists will look at the challenges currently affecting the city centre such as the legacy of the Covid 19 pandemic, the high number of vacant buildings and the decline in shopfront retail, as well as how solutions to these challenges can help tackle the climate crisis. 

After hearing from our expert panelists, we’ll open it up to you for questions and discussion, so you can have your say about how we can shape a city centre that maintains its historic character and is accessible, safe and functional for Glasgow’s people and visitors. 

The event will be chaired by Bailie Christy Mearns, Depute Lord Provost 

The panellists will be: 

Paola Pasino, Glasgow City Council 

Tam Coyle, Chair of the Merchant City & Trongate Community Council 

Thierry Lye, Chair of the New Glasgow Society 

Euan Leitch, Chief Executive of SURF 

Booking Essential 

£7 per person, £5 concessions 

Please note: Payment is taken via PayPal but you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay online. 

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Each year, our events help over 2000 people to understand and appreciate Glasgow's irreplaceable built heritage. Can you help us to reach more people?

We are hugely grateful for the support of our Friends whose subscriptions help cover the costs of these events, thereby ensuring accessible pricing for everyone in Glasgow in these challenging times.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our Friends scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Online CPD: Architecture and Health in Historic Buildings

Image of corner of red sandstone tenement

Thursday 8th September 2022 | 12.30-1.30pm | via Zoom

As we continue to respond to the Covid 19 pandemic, focus has turned to how poor building design can contribute to the spread of airborne diseases. Older buildings are sometimes portrayed as unhealthy and subject to being damp and uncomfortable. But historic buildings, particularly those from the late 19th century, were often far more pragmatic at creating integrated approaches to combatting infection than modern ones.

In this CPD, Dr Richard Hobday will discuss what historic buildings can teach us about managing airborne infections through a mix of passive ventilation, material characteristics, and quality of internal space. He will also look at how retaining these characteristics is key when refurbishing historic buildings, and demonstrate how past approaches to combatting infection in buildings remain relevant for creating healthy internal environments.

Dr Richard Hobday practices inter-disciplinary research which brings together engineering, building design, architectural and medical history, urban planning, and public health. He received his PhD in engineering from Cranfield University where he designed and assessed solar energy technologies. He has since been involved in a wide range of projects concerning sustainability and health in the built environment. He is the author of two books and numerous technical reports. He has also written and co-authored academic papers on infection control in buildings, hospital design, school design and public health. He is a member of the Daylight Academy, Switzerland.

All GCHT CPD sessions are recognised by the IHBC, and attendees can obtain a CPD certificate upon completion.

£15 per person / £10 for students

 

All sessions are recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as being capable of contributing to the obligatory CPD requirements of Full Members (see www.ihbc.org.uk)

We are using Zoom to broadcast our live talks. You can join these events as a participant without creating a Zoom account. You do not need to have a webcam or a microphone to join the event as a participant.

We aim to make our events as accessible as possible but if you feel that you might need some additional help, please let us know when you book your ticket or get in touch in advance. We’re open to feedback and would welcome your ideas on how we can improve in this area.

You will receive instructions on joining the event by email. If you haven’t received anything by midday on the day of the event, please check your spam folder and then contact us.

You might also be interested in…

Glasgow Historic Environment: A Snapshot – 2019

Ever wondered which buildings in your neighbourhood are listed, or even on Scotland’s Buildings at Risk Register?

Our new interactive map shows data collated between February and April 2018 which gives a snapshot of the current state of Glasgow’s historic built environment.

Blog Post: Ghosts and Zombies

Read our latest blog post about our Ghost Signs of Glasgow project, pondering the nature of ghost signs and what they tell us about the urban landscape.

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Results of the 2022 Historic Environment Survey

RESULTS OF THE 2022 HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT SURVEY

Over the spring of 2022 GCHT launched a public survey on perspectives towards Glasgow’s built heritage, receiving just under 500 response from members of the public to eight questions on Glasgow’s urban landscape. This is a fantastic response, demonstrating the important role our architectural inheritance holds in the lives of people who live and work in Glasgow today. It also provides important viewpoints going forward on how Glaswegians want their city to look and feel in the future.

The survey is part of GCHT’s Snapshot, an ongoing research project which gathers a city-wide perspective of Glasgow’s built historic environment. The aim is to provide a baseline of information, together in one place, to help provoke discussion, illustrate trends and inform decision making. More information about the project can be found here.

Three people wearing high viz jackets stand in front of a building covered in scaffolding

WHO TOOK THE SURVEY? 

The survey captured the views of a diverse section of society. It does, though, vary from the demographics representative of Glasgow’s people, with 76% of respondents resident in the city. Almost 65% of respondents were over 45 years of age, this contrasts to the estimate of Glasgow’s population in 2020 of 47% within that age bracket, while those 44 and under, comprising 37% of the population, represents 34% of survey respondents. Only one respondent identified as under 16 (despite under 16s comprising 17% of the population).

Of the 498 responses, 27% identified as having a professional engagement with the heritage sector, while 60% felt the term “heritage enthusiast” best described themselves. In total, five elected officials responded.

Yellow bar chart showing range of age demographics for survey respondents. Under 16 is .2%, 16-24 is 2.5%, 25-34% is 13.6%, 35-44 is 17.8%, 45-54 is 24.1%, 55-64 is 24.1%, 65+ is 16.3%, No Response is 1.7%
Blue bar chart of survey respondents's backgrounds: Heritage Enthusiast: 59.7%, Construction Professional: 10.5%, Heritage Professional: 10.2%, Charity/Third Sector Organisation: 6.3%, Student: 4.5%, Planner: 2.9%, Heritage Organisation: 2.1%, Contractor/Tradesperson: 1.3%, Elected Official: 1.3%, Apprentice: .3%, Other: 1%

HOW PEOPLE FEEL ABOUT GLASGOW’S BUILT HERITAGE

Understandably, those who responded to the survey are engaged with the value of heritage, 93% answering that Glasgow’s built heritage was very important for them.

Overwhelmingly, respondents felt that Glasgow’s architectural heritage was in an unacceptable condition (28% very poor and 49% quite poor). Worryingly, the trend identified by 79% of respondents was that the condition of the city’s historic urban fabric was “getting worse”, contrasted by only 5% who felt the status to be improving.

Green bar graph with how respondents feel about the current condition of Glasgow's historic buildings: Excellent: 0.4%, Quite Good: 6%, Acceptable: 16.1%, Quite Poor: 49%, Very Poor: 28.1%, Unsure/No Opinion: 0.4%
Red bar graph saying how survey respondents feel about maintenance trends for Glasgow's historic buildings: Getting Worse: 79.1%, Stable: 7.6%, Getting better: 5.4%, Unsure/No Opinion: 7.8%

COMMENTS FROM PEOPLE SURVEYED

The survey provided an opportunity to leave comments, which 53% of those surveyed did. These comments have been analysed and can loosely be categorised into eight main themes:

  1. Call to action: Sentiments that expressed the need to take immediate action (e.g., specific buildings of concern)
  2. Wider context: Considerations need to be given to wider influences in society (e.g., deprivation, climate emergency, comparison with other cities):
  3. Criticism of planning: (e.g, council needs to act further on its responsibilities)
  4. Incorrect approach or philosophy of heritage sector: (e.g., in prioritisation of projects, variations across the city)
  5. Opposition to new buildings and commercial development: (e.g., demolition of older buildings instead of repair)
  6. Ways to enforce repair and restoration: (e.g., greater protection for architectural heritage)
  7. Need for broader political action: (e.g., national or city-wide policies)
  8. Lack of public interest: (e.g., ignorance of Glasgow’s architectural history)

“I’m saddened by the decline in Glasgow’s historic environment in recent years, and the general air of neglect that is growing in parts of the city. The Council needs to fight for funds to protect and preserve it. It’s Scotland’s biggest city with a glorious architectural heritage. It isn’t enough to have Edinburgh’s older architecture cared for. Scotland needs Glasgow to be better too.”

“(It is) very important to protect and enhance Glasgow’s historic environment to make it distinctive, exciting, dynamic, full of civic pride, and to address environmental issues of climate change.”

“Too much of our history is left to rot until safety is the excuse to demolish. We need to invest for our community, for jobs, for tourism and have a place we are proud of to call home. We are custodians, time we protected and promoted our built environment for future generations.”

“I think it’s very import to preserve the history of Glasgow for future generations to love and enjoy!”

VACANT AND DERELICT BUIDLINGS 

Participants were also asked to indicate all the different ways they felt that vacant and derelict buildings impacted the surrounding communities. The negative impact to civic pride ranked foremost (92%) closely followed by negative impacts to a community’s wellbeing (76%) and an increase in anti-social behaviour (73%). 64% of respondents also thought vacant and derelict buildings lead to less community cohesion, though only 48% of people were concerned about an impact in property prices.

OBSTACLES TO IMPROVEMENT 

Given these widely shared sentiments, it is important to understand what is considered to be the biggest barrier to improving the condition of Glasgow’s historic environment. Interestingly, lack of political will, not availability of investment, was identified as the main obstacle to improving the city’s architectural heritage, respectively 44% versus 36% with all other factors polling under 10%.

Yellow bar chart showing what barriers survey respondents feel there is for improving Glasgow's Built Heritage: Political will: 43.8%, Lack of money: 36.1%, Having a viable end use for the building: 7.4%, Public perception of its importance: 7.2%, The complexity of historic building projects: 3.6%, Other: 1.8%

FUNDING 

One aspect of this criticism of political will is better understood in the response received to the question “What do you think should be the main source of funding for the restoration of historic buildings?” The majority of the survey respondents supported the main source of financial support to be from public funds (54%), and setting aside both those without a fixed opinion and those who prioritised third-sector sources of funding (e.g., community or charitable grant funding), only 10% supported commercial development as a means to fund restoration works.

It is possible that negative perceptions of the private sector development of historic buildings and historic sites has partly influenced this response, namely, a lack of trust in the property development and construction sectors. This should also be coupled with an important civic tradition in Glasgow of providing funding for works when considered as public goods. Indeed, there was a strong sense that investment in historic building restoration has particular social value.

Given this need for public funds, and other priorities on local authority and government budgets, we asked respondents “Should the restoration of historic buildings be a priority for public funds?” almost half (47%) felt it should be a high priority and a further 48% thought it should be of some priority. This indicates that investment in built heritage was seen to have many benefits beyond just architectural preservation.

Red bar graph asking survey respondents what should be the main sources of funding for historic buildings: Public Funds: 53.6%, Charitable Grants: 14.1%, Private Development: 10.4%, Community Funds: 3.8%, Unsure/No Opinion: 12%, Other: 6%
blue bar graph asking if survey respondents think historic buildings should be a priority for public funds: High priority: 47.4%, Some Priority: 48.2%, No Particular Priority: 3%, Low Priority: 0.8%, Unsure/No opinion: 0.6%

AWARENESS

One other issue identified by the survey is the amount of awareness of current building conservation and renovation projects. Despite the high-level of interest in Glasgow’s historic built environment captured in the demographic section of the survey, 78% of respondents were aware of fewer than three active projects. Of which, 24% had no knowledge whatsoever of a current building conservation or renovation project in Glasgow.

This evidence shows that the heritage sector itself is not as successful as perhaps it needs to be to highlight the existence of individual projects or disseminate best practices and approaches to an already engaged audience who could channel their interest into more tangible support.

Green bar chart asking survey respondents how many building conservation projects are aware of at the moment: 1-3: 53.6%, 4-7: 15.7%, 7+: 6.8%, None: 18.5%, Aware of projects not in Glasgow: 5.4%

SURVEY TAKEAWAYS 

The survey demonstrates the strength of feeling regarding the city’s built heritage. While the survey provided an important outlet to criticise the status quo, it also outlined the level of passion and support. A call to action – that Glasgow’s architectural gems can and must be saved – was by the far the most common response. We must remember that 93% of respondents valued the city’s built heritage highly. The survey showed that Glasgow’s historic buildings are beautiful, they are something of which people are proud and above all, people want them to be loved, cared for, and appreciated by everyone.

Report compiled for GCHT by Sam Gallacher, independent consultant

CPD Recording: Upgrading a Traditional Tenement Building

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Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Online Talk: 19th Century Retail and the Rise of the Department Store

Wednesday 8th December 2021 | 7.30pm GMT | via Zoom

Focusing on architecture, window displays, and internal design, this talk will examine how Glasgow department stores, like their Parisian counterparts, became spaces not just of spectacle, but also of manipulation and disorientation.

The Map

“I feel like a bird soaring over the city when I gaze upon Sulman’s map, every nook and cranny with every detail so exact.

I can see where I came from and where I’m at.”

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

Video Recording: A Bird’s-Eye View of the Development of Glasgow University

You might also be interested in…

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Online Talk: 19th Century Retail and the Rise of the Department Store

Wednesday 8th December 2021 | 7.30pm GMT | via Zoom

Focusing on architecture, window displays, and internal design, this talk will examine how Glasgow department stores, like their Parisian counterparts, became spaces not just of spectacle, but also of manipulation and disorientation.

The Map

“I feel like a bird soaring over the city when I gaze upon Sulman’s map, every nook and cranny with every detail so exact.

I can see where I came from and where I’m at.”

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.

Video Recording: The Glasgow Lock Hospital for Unfortunate Females

You might also be interested in…

Enjoy Family Fun with our Kids Trails!

Download our Kid’s Heritage Trails!

Online Talk: 19th Century Retail and the Rise of the Department Store

Wednesday 8th December 2021 | 7.30pm GMT | via Zoom

Focusing on architecture, window displays, and internal design, this talk will examine how Glasgow department stores, like their Parisian counterparts, became spaces not just of spectacle, but also of manipulation and disorientation.

The Map

“I feel like a bird soaring over the city when I gaze upon Sulman’s map, every nook and cranny with every detail so exact.

I can see where I came from and where I’m at.”

Become a Friend of Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Glasgow City Heritage Trust is an independent charity and your support is crucial to ensure that our charitable work promoting the understanding, appreciation and conservation of Glasgow’s historic buildings for the benefit of the city’s communities and its visitors continues now, and in the future.

The easiest way to support the Trust’s work is to join our loyalty scheme. Our tiered loyalty scheme means you can choose the level that’s right for you.

Support us

Like many other charities, the coronavirus outbreak is having a major impact on our activities, threatening our crucial work to protect, repair and celebrate Glasgow’s rich built heritage. As a result, we expect to lose an important part of our income this year.

We are therefore asking that if you are able to support our conservation and outreach work,
please consider donating to the Trust.